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NBA Draft Combine: Shooting Drill Results

Fri, 05/28/2010 - 7:58am
Player Spot-Up Shooting Shooting off the Dribble
College 3-pointers
(makes out of 25 shots)
Percentage NBA 3-pointers
(makes out of 25 shots)
Percentage 15'-18' jumpers
(makes out of 24 shots)
Percentage
James Anderson 13 52.0% 9 36.0% 15 62.5%
Luke Babbitt 21 84.0% 19 76.0% 16 66.7%
Eric Bledsoe 15 60.0% 15 60.0% 19 79.2%
Avery Bradley 14 56.0% 16 64.0% 14 58.3%
Sherron Collins 16 64.0% 17 68.0% 18 75.0%
Jordan Crawford 16 64.0% 20 80.0% 16 66.7%
Devin Ebanks 9 36.0% 8 32.0% 17 70.8%
Charles Garcia 9 36.0% 8 32.0% 11 45.8%
Paul George 13 52.0% 16 64.0% 21 87.5%
Manny Harris 14 56.0% 14 56.0% 14 58.3%
Gordon Hayward 18 72.0% 15 60.0% 15 62.5%
Lazar Hayward 17 68.0% 15 60.0% 16 66.7%
Xavier Henry 20 80.0% 13 52.0% 14 58.3%
Darington Hobson 16 64.0% 9 36.0% 16 66.7%
Damion James 11 44.0% 12 48.0% 8 33.3%
Armon Johnson 19 76.0% 11 44.0% 15 62.5%
Dominique Jones 18 72.0% 15 60.0% 12 50.0%
Sylven Landesberg 15 60.0% 11 44.0% 18 75.0%
Andy Rautins 20 80.0% 19 76.0% 20 83.3%
Stanley Robinson 11 44.0% 11 44.0% 10 41.7%
Lance Stephenson 12 48.0% 9 36.0% 16 66.7%
Mikhail Torrance 20 80.0% 14 56.0% 15 62.5%
Greivis Vasquez 16 64.0% 15 60.0% 15 62.5%
Willie Warren 19 76.0% 18 72.0% 19 79.2%
Terrico White 15 60.0% 16 64.0% 15 62.5%

Player Timed Shooting on the Move (45 seconds per set)
15'-18' jumpers
Set #1
(right elbow to baseline)
Set #2
(elbow to elbow)
Set #3
(left elbow to baseline)
Makes Attempts Percentage Makes Attempts Percentage Makes Attempts Percentage
James Anderson 12 16 75.0% 12 19 63.2% 11 15 73.3%
Luke Babbitt 9 13 69.2% 11 13 84.6% 11 15 73.3%
Eric Bledsoe 9 15 60.0% 12 14 85.7% 13 15 86.7%
Avery Bradley 7 12 58.3% 9 15 60.0% 8 14 57.1%
Sherron Collins 11 14 78.6% 9 14 64.3% 11 13 84.6%
Jordan Crawford 10 14 71.4% 12 17 70.6% 13 16 81.3%
Devin Ebanks 8 14 57.1% 9 14 64.3% 9 14 64.3%
Charles Garcia 7 14 50.0% 5 11 45.5% 6 13 46.2%
Paul George 7 14 50.0% 10 12 83.3% 6 15 40.0%
Manny Harris 9 14 64.3% 13 15 86.7% 12 14 85.7%
Gordon Hayward 10 15 66.7% 9 14 64.3% 9 15 60.0%
Lazar Hayward 13 16 81.3% 11 17 64.7% 13 18 72.2%
Xavier Henry 8 14 57.1% 10 16 62.5% 11 15 73.3%
Darington Hobson 6 13 46.2% 9 16 56.3% 9 14 64.3%
Damion James 5 12 41.7% 11 15 73.3% 8 15 53.3%
Armon Johnson 10 13 76.9% 9 14 64.3% 11 14 78.6%
Dominique Jones 12 15 80.0% 10 15 66.7% 11 14 78.6%
Sylven Landesberg 9 15 60.0% 10 16 62.5% 10 15 66.7%
Andy Rautins 8 12 66.7% 10 12 83.3% 10 14 71.4%
Stanley Robinson 6 14 42.9% 10 14 71.4% 7 13 53.8%
Lance Stephenson 12 15 80.0% 5 13 38.5% 10 14 71.4%
Mikhail Torrance 13 13 100.0% 13 15 86.7% 13 14 92.9%
Greivis Vasquez 11 16 68.8% 15 17 88.2% 13 16 81.3%
Willie Warren 11 15 73.3% 13 15 86.7% 12 16 75.0%
Terrico White 12 13 92.3% 10 14 71.4% 13 15 86.7%


Overall Shooting Percentages

Player Makes Attempts Overall %
James Anderson
72
124
58.1%
Luke Babbitt
87
115
75.7%
Eric Bledsoe
83
118
70.3%
Avery Bradley
68
116
58.6%
Sherron Collins
82
115
71.3%
Jordan Crawford
87
121
71.9%
Devin Ebanks
60
116
51.7%
Charles Garcia
46
112
41.1%
Paul George
73
115
63.5%
Manny Harris
76
117
65.0%
Gordon Hayward
76
118
64.4%
Lazar Hayward
85
125
68.0%
Xavier Henry
84
119
70.6%
Darington Hobson
65
117
55.6%
Damion James
55
116
47.4%
Armon Johnson
85
115
73.9%
Dominique Jones
78
118
66.1%
Sylven Landesberg
73
120
60.8%
Andy Rautins
87
112
77.7%
Stanley Robinson
55
115
47.8%
Lance Stephenson
64
116
55.2%
Mikhail Torrance
88
116
75.9%
Greivis Vasquez
85
123
69.1%
Willie Warren
92
120
76.7%
Terrico White
81
116
69.8%

Analysis

Winners:

Four players shot above 75%: Andy Rautins (77.7%), Willie Warren (76.7%), Mikhail Torrance (75.9), Luke Babbitt (75.7%).

Rautins was absolutely scorching at close to 80%.

Warren made the most shots knocking down a total of 92 (four more than Torrance).

Torrance showed that not only did he belong at the combine after impressing with his versatility at Portsmouth, but he's also one of the best shooters in this year's draft class.

Babbitt continues to impress. First he measured 6-9 in shoes with a 6-11.25 wingspan. Next he measured a 37.5 inch vertical. And then he shows what he's shown all season, he's a dead eye shooter.

Armon Johnson (73.9%) surprisingly was the fifth best overall shooter, after having impressed in both the athleticism tests (38 inch vertical) and measurements (6'3 with a 6'8 wingspan).

Jordan Crawford (71.9%), Sherron Collins (71.3%), Xavier Henry (70.6%), Eric Bledsoe (70.3%), Terrico White (69.8%) all shot extrememly well, above or at 70%.

Lazar Hayward not only shot close to 70% (68%) but got off the most shots with 125, showing a quick release.

Losers:

Charles Garcia had the most dismal shooting performance hitting just 46 of 112 (41.1%),which is a little surprising because his shooting form has looked pretty good.

Damion James shot just 47.4%. This was a little surprising as he has improved his shot from the perimeter over the past few years. Granted he's a forward and many of the other players that shot are guards.

Stanley Robinson had the second lowest percentage at (47.8%), which isn't surprising. He's not a potential first rounder because of his shooting ability.

Devin Ebanks struggled at (51.7%) particularly on his 3 point shots where he hit just 17 of 50 (34%).

Lance Stephenson shot just 55%. He struggled on the NBA 3 pointers and the elbow to elbow 15-18 foot shots on the move.

James Anderson struggled and for a player that is known for his shooting ability, 58% while unguarded is not good enough.

rtbt
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Website Suggestion for Shooting Results

Just like the combine results, it would be nice to have the ability to click on each column title and sort it from lowest to highest.

Thanks

sheltwon3
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Some people tend to make the

Some people tend to make the shots when it counts in games. All this tells you is that some of these guys either did not have a good shooting day or they are not deadshooter but are smart scorers. I will take a scorer over shooter any day. I wonder what percentage Jordan would have shot in one of these test o Kobe yet but player you dont want the ball in their hands at the end of a close game if you are the other team.

llperez
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interesting stuff. This

interesting stuff. This doesnt look too good for the guys trying to go first round and are considered perimter players like andersen, ebanks, james and stephenson.

sc0rebuckets11
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I'm tellin you

Andy Rautins should have a home in the NBA.

Willie Warren is pretty dead on with his mid-range.

Only thing these drills don't do is show guy's shot selection, because there are a lot of guys in the combine that take bad shots.

HotSnot
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Workout wonders, Ever been in

Workout wonders,

Ever been in a gym... putting up shot after shot, you get a rhythm going and it seems like everything you put up goes in.

Phil Jackson described Sasha Vujacic (The machine) as a practise wonder. He hits everything in practise. He`s comfortable in that setting. Once he gets in games his shot disappears... Well not really. He has great form. You know he`s a great shooter when he`s comfortable. Similar to what happened to Channing Frye against the Lakers. I don`t know if there`s ever been a time in that guys entire life where he would shoot 1-20. Confidence is a fragile thing. When you miss in practise you can get the ball right back and hoist up another shot. Miss in a game and now you have to play defense and there`s no guarantee when you`ll get another shot. Might be the next possession or the next half. Every shot you put up counts.

In practise you can make a shot correction in a few seconds. Miss one and you realize it was flat or it rolled a little akward off your fingers or your wrist feels stiff, your release was low etc etc... you make quick adjustments. Your looking for that familiar stroke.

Game situations tend to change things for players. A hand in your face. Running up and down the court 3 or 4 times and then hitting a clutch 3. A 3 you know matters to your team at that point in the game. You might be winded or tired. You might have caught an elbow fighting your way through a screen a few seconds before while you were running your a$$ off and the second you get the ball in your hands for a catch in shoot you have to loosen up your whole body for that familiar stroke. The difference between a hit or miss when shooting from distance is so small, nerves play a huge factor. Your ability to replicate that shot you make over and over in practise disappears because now your whole body is tense and you know whats on the line. You might jump abit higher, rush your release or just feel unnerved with the ball in your hand in a game situation. Everything changes.

The really great shooters block out everything and keep their emotions in check. They don`t panic. Their confident. They approach their shot the exact same way they do in practise no matter whats on the line. You breath, be calm and try to replicate that familiar feel, motion and release of those shots you`ve hit so many times in practise. Its easier said then done.

Id much rather trust their college game shooting stats then any combine shooting drills. The combine might give me a chance to learn more about the player and get an up close look at form and practise habits compared to the game footage I`ve seen, but I would take these results with a grain of salt.

As sc0rebuckets11 mention shot selection is another huge factor. sheltwon3 also brought up a very valid point about ``good shooting days``. Theres so much more that goes into all this that these results can be extremely deceiving.

TaylorCondrin
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as a note for your future, it

as a note for your future, it is "practice" not practise

but good post

HotSnot
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Spelling was never my strong

Spelling was never my strong point. I`m canadian though eh... we spell it both ways. I get the verb and noun usuage mixed up. Point taken though. I should just stick to the US spelling so i can`t screw it up.

AKOO
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Bledsoe and George

Helped themselves again, kinda becoming a theme with those 2.

Mr. 19134
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Good Stuff

Do you realize how much pressure is on these prospects with every single important person from every organization looking in the gym and there you are puttin shots up knowing everything you do from your jump to your shooting form is being recorded and documented. So for for the players come go in there and shoot well it shows they have alot of confidence and Luke Babbitt looks like a lottery talent.

Meditated States
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Yeah

I agree Babbitt is looking real good right now. He can jump and he can shoot lights out. Has a solid overall game with scary shooting ability. I think Jordan Crawford could shock some people.

bigblackNbeautiful
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I feel like

Torrance will end up a future laker. and there future pg.

gremlinhunter53
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question?

for the shooting drills, are these uncontested jumpers? like just them on a court shooting? or is there defense or what? like is it in game situation or is it like them in a gym shooting (albeit with ALOT more pressure)

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