share

Production vs Potential

Lindsey
Registered User
Joined: 12/09/2012
Posts: 261
Points: 563
Offline
Production vs Potential

Pretty simple question here. When does everyone generally start looking passed the potential for greatness of a leaguer, and simply start looking at his production in analyzing how good he is. I know in college it is much easier to differentiate between which will be more successful down the road, due to wider variances in skill, age, and a much larger pool of players to draw from.

My question really stems from players like a Paul George, or Javale McGhee, etc. When discussing players like these, what mostly comes up is "once he develops ____ aspect of his game, then he'll be a star". Often we hear this type of discussion of these players into the 5th or 6th season. When do we stop looking at what they could be, and just accept them for what they are?

Thoughts...?


Lebron's Hairline
Lebron's Hairline's picture
Registered User
Joined: 06/07/2012
Posts: 2152
Points: 5928
Offline
I'm not a fan of "potential",

I'm not a fan of "potential", that word gets thrown around to much and is the reason guys like Anthony Randolph and Michael Beasley are still around the league. The word potential is why guys like Grevis Vasquez, Kyrie irving( no one thought he would be this good), and joakim Noah were labeled as high floor/low ceiling players yet they continue to overachieve.

lakeshow22
Registered User
Joined: 06/13/2012
Posts: 475
Points: 422
Offline
There were people who thought

There were people who thought that Kyrie Irving would be a superstar, Seth Davis of sports illustrated said at the time of the draft that Irving would be on the same level as Chris Paul and Derrick Rose one day.

HotSnot
Registered User
Joined: 05/20/2010
Posts: 739
Points: -1421
Offline
I feel people over estimate

I feel people over estimate the amount of improvement a player labeled to have "potential" can have. It is dependent on many factors but there is a limit to how much a given player can improve regardless of how much work he puts in.

Typically speaking, the version we see of a given player in highschool/college/europe, is not all that different from how the "finished product" looks in the NBA. Decision making improves, skill level goes up, conditioning and athletic ability increase... but you can certainly still see many of the same characteristics, the same overall frame work of who that player was earlier on in his development.

IE Its not like O.J. Mayo was going to develop into Wade after a few years in the NBA no matter what type of training, coaching and work he put in. In this example its obvious Mayo has improved in all facets but he is still similar to the player we saw in highschool and college. There is a certain style to every players game that never seems to go away.

If you look at "potential" in that light, you start to think differently.

Mr. 19134
Mr. 19134's picture
Registered User
Joined: 05/21/2010
Posts: 3439
Points: 3409
Offline
Nobody can answer this

Nobody can answer this question for obvious reasons. I would say tho it omly takes lile 2 or 3 years in the league to realize if a player has IT or not.

I was a huge Paul George fan during that draft firmly believing he was the best SF prospect in the draft and should of went 4th to Minny. But Id be lying if I saw his month of December coming, he tramsformed from the next Rudy Gay to the next T Mac and Im not sure if the draft was redone in nindsight that he wouldnt go 1st.

Lebron's Hairline
Lebron's Hairline's picture
Registered User
Joined: 06/07/2012
Posts: 2152
Points: 5928
Offline
Whoa Calm down Paul george is

Whoa Calm down Paul george is good but he's not THAT good

goroi83883
Registered User
Joined: 01/08/2013
Posts: 13
Points: -7
Offline
If you look at "potential" in

If you look at "potential" in that light, you start to think differently.

RSS: Syndicate content