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An Essay on Racism (BE HONEST DO YOU ROOT FOR YOUR OWN RACE IN SPORTS MORE THAN OTHERS)

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An Essay on Racism (BE HONEST DO YOU ROOT FOR YOUR OWN RACE IN SPORTS MORE THAN OTHERS)

As Palo Alto's Jeremy Lin leads his Harvard hoops squad toward victory, an Atlanta promoter launches an all-white basketball league, leading Jeff Yang to ponder the light and dark side of rooting for the race.

It was an announcement carefully designed to provoke the biggest spit-take possible: On Jan. 18, one day after the federal holiday celebrating the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., sports promoter Don "Moose" Lewis issued a media alert proclaiming his intention to found a new pro hoops league called the All-American Basketball Alliance -- which would distinguish itself from the NBA by allowing as players only "natural-born United States citizens with both parents of Caucasian race."

Those who weren't outraged wondered if the release wasn't an early April Fool's Day prank. But Lewis, reached last week at his offices in Atlanta, asserts that he's dead serious, and that the league's formal debut on the pine is just months away. "We're looking at a June tipoff," he says.

Lewis's claims can't be entirely dismissed out of hand. He's been a sports promoter for two decades, and is the proprietor of the International Boxing Union, a legitimate, if lesser, sanctioning authority that, back in 2003, boasted as its heavyweight champion Shannon Briggs, and has managed to secure ESPN broadcasts of its championship title fights. Meanwhile, an earlier basketball league he founded in 2001, the Global Basketball Alliance (the name remains on the voicemail at Lewis's office), managed to attract eight teams and stage an amateur draft, before folding in April 2002.

"We started as the American Basketball Alliance, and then got a letter from Big Brother in New York," says Lewis. "Apparently, we conflicted with one of the NBA's registered marks. So we changed our name to the Global Basketball Alliance, which was fine because one of our teams was in Mexico City. And we held two seasons of what was basically conventional minor league basketball, but the league just never took off."

Lewis candidly admits that ticket sales were "dismal." "You have the same problem with all minor-league basketball teams, even the subsidized ones like the NBA D-League," he says. "People ask themselves the question, 'Should I spend $20 to see NBA Lite, or should I sit in my living room, drinking beer and watching 500 HD channels on my big screen TV?' I know my answer to that."

Pondering a way to get butts into seats, Lewis took a cue from the headlines. "You look at the papers and you see that Middle Americans, they're having a tough time. Their houses are in foreclosure," he says. "They need a good, wholesome, affordable distraction, and they're nostalgic for genuine American entertainment. And I thought to myself, remember when basketball was real basketball -- none of this 'five steps to the hoop, palming the ball' stuff? Remember Pistol Pete and Larry Bird? Where's that all gone?"

The answer, Lewis surmised, is that it disappeared when the NBA became dominated by street-ball players and foreigners -- turning white Americans into minorities in the league, just like "white, native-born Americans" are becoming a "minority of the U.S. population."

"The thing is, people embrace things they can identify with," he says. "One billion Chinese can relate to Yao Ming -- and that's who they want to see. Now you've got millions of Americans who, I think, want to see players and a style of game they can relate to. We all want to root for our own kind -- it's just human nature."

Colors on the court

Of course, much of Lewis's language is, bluntly speaking, a screen for the most insidious type of racism imaginable -- the type that denies itself while simultaneously claiming injury from a historically victimized population. When he uses the term "our kind," it echoes the bristling, preemptively hateful phrase "your kind" -- as in, "We don't like 'your kind' 'round here." When he says that the NBA is full of uncouth, showboating brawlers ("Would you want to go to the game and worry about a player flipping you off or attacking you in the stands?"), he's putting family-friendly context around a subtext that's rooted in white fear of a black planet.

But it's hard to argue at least one of Lewis's points -- that we tend to cheer on people who resemble us -- and a roundup of some of the biggest Asian American sports fans I know didn't even try.

"There's no doubt that when I see an Asian face on the field of play, I'm suddenly more interested," says Brian Yang, a Bay Area-bred actor/producer and hoops fanatic who now divides his time between New York and Shanghai. "We grew up loving Bird, Jordan, LeBron. But when Yao Ming came along -- seeing an Asian player on the court, especially as a star, stirs the senses in a different way, because we ethnically identify with that person."

And more than just sports are at stake, points out Bernard Chang, a comic book artist and illustrator who in his spare time plays point in a competitive rec league and coaches a team of six-year-old aspiring hoopsters. "We live in such a visual society these days, that any symbol of recognition is critical," he says. "Many would say that it shouldn't matter -- and, yes, in a perfect world it wouldn't -- but the fact is, you can't discount the importance of seeing a 'familiar face'" -- especially when it's up on the Jumbotron, in an arena full of screaming fans.

That's because in the U.S., athletic skill defines perceptions of social status like no other area of achievement. "Keep in mind that for many people -- both men and women -- sports define masculinity," says Albert Kim, former senior editor for Sports Illustrated. "The implicit message [of the lack of Asians in sports] is that Asian men just aren't as 'manly' as black or white men" -- something that turns out to have real social, political and even economic consequences. After all, how many otherwise unqualified ex-athletes have we elected to higher office? How often do sports metaphors get used in boardrooms (and, uh, bedrooms), carrying with them the explicit implication that benchwarmers and sideline boosters are also-rans in life and love -- not just on the field or court?

Hoop dreams

Carrying a community's dreams on your shoulders is tough enough. Being the proxy for an entire race's manhood, as absurd as it sounds, is a responsibility one wouldn't wish on anyone. And yet, the search for that individual -- the avatar of Asian American athletic fantasies -- continues, most recently landing on a player who in many ways epitomizes the challenges Asians face in breaking into the big leagues of professional sports, while presenting the best hope yet for overcoming them.

In his senior year of high school, Jeremy Lin, the Bay Area-born son of Taiwanese immigrants, took the underdog Palo Alto Vikings to a 32-1 record, and then to a shocking upset victory over the nationally ranked Mater Dei Monarchs in the state Division II championships, scoring 17 points and garnering unanimous accolades as Player of the Year by every influential publication in California sports (including the San Francisco Chronicle). Yet upon graduating, the number of scholarship offers he received from the NCAA's Division I powers could be counted on a closed fist.

"Coaches, scouts and recruiters have to be willing to be color-blind in their evaluation of players," says ESPN anchor Michael Kim. "But you have to wonder if they'd fairly judge a 6-foot 3-inch, 175 pound Asian guard with a similar talent and skillset as a black or white player. And in the case of Jeremy Lin, it doesn't appear as if they did."

Which means that Lin ended up going to his backup school, Harvard University -- an academic powerhouse, but a basketball backwater. For most talented but frustrated hoops hopefuls, that might have been the end of the story. Lin simply did what he'd done at Palo Alto High: Took a team that had been written off as hopeless and put it on his back. By his junior year, he was the only player in the nation to rank among the top 10 players in his conference in every major category -- from points to rebounds, assists, steals, and blocks, to field goal, free throw and three-point percentage. This year, he's been even better, leading to suggestions that he might be the first Asian American to be drafted as an NBA first-round pick since Rex Walters, the hapa Japanese star for the University of Kansas's Jayhawks who was drafted 16th in 1993, played eight seasons in the NBA, and is now coach for the USF Dons.

Lin himself doesn't want to speculate on his pro potential. "I just want to help Harvard win games, and hopefully, an Ivy League title," he says, noting that the expectations of his community are a motivator, but also a distraction. "I'm humbled and honored by the attention I've received -- but right now I'm focused on our team and getting better each day. There'll be time to think about this later."

Lin's fans aren't as patient. They obsessively track his stats, watch YouTube videos of his highlights, debate the high and low points of his game (pros: great basketball IQ, complete player; cons: a 'tweener without a true position, has a funky jumper), and repeatedly assess and reassess his likelihood of NBA success based on every pundit's postgame comments.

"Jeremy has a legit shot at the pros -- albeit a long shot, like from half court," says Steve Chin, an Albany-based journalist and Web producer, and a longtime board member of the Bay Area's Ohtani Asian American basketball program. "But it would mean a lot for the community if he made it. It's uncharted territory for Asian Americans -- to play pro ball in the modern era. He would become an instant role model for Asian American athletes. I'm rooting for him."

And so are thousands of other Asian American fans, who've recently been flocking to games decked out in red -- a hue reflecting both Harvard's crimson and the color believed by Chinese to be a symbol of luck and prosperity.

Sports, in black and white
It's ironic that even as Asian Americans are hanging their hopes on the promise of a single player breaking through to the NBA, Don "Moose" Lewis is pinning his league's potential on getting Caucasian Americans to turn away from it -- and he thinks that potential is huge.

"We're filling a niche. You're Asian and you want to see Asian players succeed, right? And white Americans want to see white players succeed -- it's just the way things are," he says. "It's no different from boxing: You see Caucasian fighters dubbed the 'Great White Hope' all the time, from Rocky Marciano on down, and where's the backlash against that?"

Lewis publicly professes innocence about the racially divisive nature of his venture -- "I have a problem with how media types have exploited and sensationalized what we're trying to do," he says -- but having begun his sports promotion career in professional wrestling, he's eminently aware of the power of controversy to get butts out from living rooms and into arenas.

And truth be told, if the best part of sport is its ability to unite us across divisions -- Jeremy Lin says that, like many of us, he grew up idolizing Michael Jordan and "would've done anything to emulate him" -- its dark underbelly has always been the use of gutter stereotypes, false dichotomies and racist and jingoist urges to sell itself.

You see it in the chants of fans at games -- even playing in the high-minded Ivy League, Lin has been the target of racist catcalling ("Go back to China!" "Open up your eyes, ch*nk!"). You see it in the marketing of teams (hat tip: Washington Redskins!). You even see it in the us-against-them ubernationalism of the Olympics.

Lewis is just being more ... candid, if you will, about what he's trying to do. When pressed about his intentions, he openly affirms that -- like most sports promoters -- his allegiance isn't toward any race, nationality or color other than green.

"There's the opportunity to make some decent money here, and this is how we're doing it -- we've been talking to several TV outlets about turning this into a reality show, where you follow the first season of the AABA, and at the end of the year, a team of AABA all-stars plays a team of black minor-league basketball all-stars," he says. "If that's successful, in our second season, we might launch an all-black league and have the champions of the two leagues compete. The kicker is the name we've come up with: 'Snowball vs. Bro-ball.' Heck, I think we'll fill up arenas just on the concept alone."

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2010/01/27/apop012710.D...
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2010/01/27/apop012710.DTL


DWadeBIW
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I didn't read the post yet

I didn't read the post yet but to answer your question YES I do support my own race(latino) because we aren't that good at any except soccer which i'm not a huge fan of. :p

the microwave
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im not saying im for this,

im not saying im for this, or that i like the idea, but there are tons of groups / orginizations / and TV programs which are geared towards certain races.. I never hear anyone speak about these things though.. Same difference / different content.... To each is own as far as im concerned.

StarbucksSucks
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I am....

I am mixed race...Mostly I identify African American. Most people have a difficult time determining my heritage. But I can say this in all honesty, above all else I root for GREATNESS race be damned. Excellence is my barometer and GAME is all that matters.

M-DYMES
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I am Russian, French Indian,

I am Russian, French Indian, Polish, German, and some Native American. I root for everyone from Alex Ovechkin to Jonny Flynn to Jared Allen to Francisco Liriano. Race doesn't play much of a factor at all in terms of my favorite players in sports. I like high energy guys who put it all on the line.

billyk
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I root for players who earn

I root for players who earn their check, the players that give it 100 i really dont care what race they are... One of my favorite competitors of all time was Dale Earnhardt becasue everytime he raced he would do what ever it takes to win...

B-ball fan
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I might root for Scalabrine

I might root for Scalabrine and Matt Bonner since I am mostly Irish, but generally I don't really care what race a player is from. Sometimes I might root a bit more for a foreign player from a country that isn't really a basketball country (such as Omri Casspi or Hasheem Thabeet) since there might be more pressure on them to succeed. Mostly I cheer for players that I like the way they play.

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DWadeBIW

Aren't there quite a few good Latino baseball players. Maybe you are not much of a baseball fan, but the baseball is pretty popular.

Anton123
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I am Russian and I must

I am Russian and I must admit I'm always happy when a European player succeeds, though with the quality of basketbol in Russia, I sure don't root for Russian basketball.
Still I guess I root for good game most of all

tli232
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Not so Much Race

Personally, I don't really identify with people of my Asian Ethnicity. I think that's just stupid, because, after all, Basketball is Basketball. Just because Kim Jong Il is my ethnicity, his political doctrine is NOT any more poignant to me than Barack Obama's

However, according to the Children's Research Lab at the University of Texas, along with NYU, discriminating based on race and colour is a habitual behaviour learned at a young age. "Kids as young as 6 months judge others based on skin color." (Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman of Newsweek, September 14th, 2009 issue) I highly suggest you check this article out or just subscribe to Newsweek just because it's a great social commentary.

But I digress. While I may not judge or cheer for basketball players of my own race, it has come to my attention that this trait I possess is not an organically cultured one. Talking to my roommate, who's a Genetics major and Anthropology minor, he explained to me that the "similar to me" type of discrimination is genetically entrenched because it used to be crucial to our survival as anyone who physically looks different posed a threat to us as they could be from a hostile rival tribe.

Regardless of our education and multicultural cosmopolitanism, our DNA has the Blueprint to be racist

It is only through behavioural perversion do we make the "racist gene" clandestine. This goes along Freudian psychology as the above research blatantly implies that racism is a part of our Id and only through nurture do our superego develop.

Calling it a racist gene perhaps isn't the most politically correct way to put it as it is apparent that it's more just a discrimination towards people who are different. I mean, this exhibited behaviour isn't just based on race. It's the same as being biased towards players on your hometown team based on geographic proximity and/or familiarity, or positively biased towards Sebastian Telfair because he's from your hood.

All in all, we are designed to like people who are similar to us. Get realistic people, it's just how it goes.

PEOPLE ALWAYS THINK THAT RACISM IS A LEARNED TRAIT, HOWEVER, IT IS APPARENT THAT NOT BEING RACIST IS THE LEARNED TRAIT.

Question: how many people are going to cheer for the North Korean Olympic team more than the American one?

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B-ball fan

b-ball fan your right I'm sorry and yes i am not much of a baseball fan but lots of spanish country's are into it.

draftnik
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I'm an African American and

I'm an African American and I root for all races in the sports I follow, but I do have a bias toward black athletes in sports that they might not have a "competitive advantage". I try not to let race get in the way of my rooting interest of the game, but sometimes that's easier said than done. A book that can somewhat explain how certain races root for their fellow brothers and sisters in ethnicity is "$40 Million Slaves" by William C. Rhoden. As far as Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans go, the book might not resonate with them, but African Americans will certainly relate to it.

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I am Jewish, and the NBA

I am Jewish, and the NBA does not have many of them, more so coaches/front office/owner/commissioner. Though, I don't let my religion dictate who I root for, or another guy's skin color. Though if a jewish player enters the league, I do get excited about it and hope he succeeds, but I do not look down upon other players for there religion or race. I don't hate players who are muslim in the NBA b/c they are muslim. I rooted for nazr mohammed when he was a knick.

crazyqx83
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I'm white. If I stuck to

I'm white. If I stuck to cheering for my own race I'd be left cheering for Peyton Manning and Joe Alexander..

tli232
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Re: Knicksfan7

I don't think that too many people of average to above average socio-economic status actually would be against a Muslim succeeding in the NBA. I think the point of this whole discussion is that You would cheer for the descendant of the Tribe of Judah more than the disciple of Mohammed

Am I right in my comprehension?

knicksfan7
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If the Player is good he can

If the Player is good he can be green for all I care. I am going to root for the player who is jewish no different than I would a muslim.

Michael.S.
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Quick question....Is Jewish

Quick question....Is Jewish a religion or race?

knicksfan7
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it is a religion.

it is a religion.

RickyRubio9
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I didn't read anything, but

I didn't read anything, but the title...But I'll admit.
I do root for Latino/Hispanic Players more then others. In NBA I root for Scola, Rudy, and some others...Don't forget Ricky Rubio! :)
In Baseball I do it, and Football I was rooting for Sanchez the whole Playoffs.
I tend to root for alot of international players in the NBA too... but by no means do I like...Hate on one single Race...

Michael.S.
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ok, so you are what race?

ok, so you are what race?

knicksfan7
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mikenike

I am Caucasian.

knicksfan7
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mikenike

I am Caucasian.

Mkadoza
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tli, is racism learned or

tli, is racism learned or not?

Is it "PEOPLE ALWAYS THINK THAT RACISM IS A LEARNED TRAIT, HOWEVER, IT IS APPARENT THAT NOT BEING RACIST IS THE LEARNED TRAIT."? or is it "discriminating based on race and colour is a habitual behaviour learned at a young age."? In my experience in a HIGHLY DIVERSE community, (my high school of 1100 has had 42 different countries represented at one point, either as a immigrant themselves or a first generation American) the only people who develop a sense of racial differences are the ones who hold on to a false sense of differences taught by societal norms or family. "Designed to like"? No person is a slave to 'natural urgings', nor does that make the 'defense mechanism' any more correct. In a world where race is so intrinsically woven into the fabric of society, its easy to pick and choose based on external factors. However, as I've said before, there is no such thing as a race when talking about DNA. Its all about your family history, histories that in all likelihood span several continents and groups of people. There is NO SUCH THING as a biological race. Its the indoctrination of the thought that race not only exists, but is extremely important, that makes Race exist. That and a lot of people can't see a person with different traits and think we are similar. My question is why? Why is skin color something so derisive when you can see hair color, eye color, and body shape and think nothing of it? Why is it Kris Humphries or Grady Sizemore are white until you find out their dads are black? The fact that people 'passed' as different races (mixed black people in the 19th century often tried to pass as Sicilian) shows how flimsy the idea of race actually is. Its a mind frame, a thought process that has very little to do with reality. Honestly, race is like religion to me. A lot of people will continue to believe in it because it separates, makes it easier to identify, and helps to define who YOU are, almost more so than the other person. For a long time in America, 'white' could be defined as the opposite of 'black' from a stereotypical standpoint. Civilized to savage, intellegent to animalistic, reserved to empassioned, good to bad. Its like nationalism, a created notion of differences that has no base except in the minds of those it impacts.

http://www.pbs.org/race/000_About/002_04-background-01-02.htm

To answer the question posed in the title, I cheer for New York and I cheer for diversity. I hated when Isiah Thomas seemed to try and trade every white person on the squad, and I hated how he Red Sox seemed adverse to allowing African Americans on the team. I just feel like until people see that race has nothing to do with anything, we wont get anywhere. And I definitely feel the racial composition of America will get a chance to prove this over time.

tli232
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Re: Mikenike, Knicksfan7

@ Mikenike

To my knowledge, Jews are a race according to classic definitions (Your mother has to be a Jew, and her mother, and so on), this means that they are an ethnicity as Jews originated from one area.

However, according to reform Judaism, either of your parents can be a Jew or you can convert. So you can be a Jew but not from the the "Jew Ethnicity"

@ Knicksfan7

I'm not trying to challenge your morale compass, but you seem to be the exception.

Ok... Theoretically, two players, a Jew and a Muslim, with same everything else came into the NBA. Who would you google more? The Jew? The Muslim (ok, not if they're like Muhamood Abdul Rauf aka Chris Jackson, lol)? Would you be more interested in one over the other? Most Jews would be.

Same as how NO NBA FAN in China Voted for anyone other than Yao Ming as the West's Starting Center for the last million years

Knicksfan7, you're one of a kind.

P.S. Do you support Israel or Palestine? No Jew I've come across has supported the Palestinians.

knicksfan7
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tli232

First I am Jewish, not Israeli they are two different things. You can be Israeli and not jewish and be israeli and jewish. I don't label the Israeli's "As my people" I have nothing against them, but I just see them as people from my religion. What goes on there does not affect me. If someone wants to label me based on my religion then something is wrong with them because that's discrimination, something that should not be condoned in any society.

As for your theoretical, if the Muslim played for the Knicks and the Jew played for the Nets, I will be more excited about my guy because he plays on my team, but I would be happy for the player who is jewish because besides Jordan Farmar no other player is Jewish in the NBA. I don't follow Jordan Farmar's career that much. This has nothing to do with one's religion or race people make it out to be that way, which is just wrong and unacceptable. Overall People who are Jewish lack height, but that doesn't make them bad athletes, Jon Scheyer of Duke is Jewish. I don't think Race or Religion should be an indicator of anything.

This may surprise you, but USC Safety NFL draft bound Taylor Mays is Jewish, but if he plays for an NFC East Rival (Giants Fan), I am sure as hell not going to root for him.

tli232
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Re; Mkadoza

I agree that Race is a social concept according to one of the Anthropology courses that I took before.

However, it is ignorant to think that purely perceptually, we do NOT see a difference between a black man and a white man.

I MUST disagree with you on your conjecture regarding skin colour. Whilst I believe that when distinguishing races, humans place more weighted value on colour than any other perceivable feature, it is NOT the only feature. There are significant differences in Facial Structure that we associate with a certain race. E.g. Caucasians have more prominent brow ridges than Orientals.

For example: Can you legitimately say that you consider any of the following people "White"?

Albino

We must not deny there are differences in the way we look. It's a wonderful thing.

sheltwon3
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tli --you seem to be a real

tli --you seem to be a real deep person and you are right everyone for the most part has prejudice

tendencies and sometimes it could be your race your state your city or just someone who may have a

similiar background. Rich people don't really connect with poor people like another poor person

would. Middle class may not really connect with another class. Everyone kind of gets more

comfortable around familiar enviroments or people. I think some of it is taught and some of it is just

something that passes from generation starting with at the Tower of Babel. I am Christian and it is

written that curses and sins of your parent past through generations like Adam's sin is pass to all of us

even though we were not there to sin. I root for everybody but I do have favorites and sometimes they

are black and sometimes they are white. I have played with people of all races and some guys remind

me of a person i may have played with that was an asset to my team. I do think when your own race is

the underdog you tend to want to support your race because you understand what that race went

through. I can not tell what kind of problems or how does another feel and I have been around

members of different races that I can tell you that we all look at thing different and members of the

same race regardless of where they were born may see some of the same things the same way and it

may be different from you and how your race views something.

knicksfan7
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Sheltwon

If the picture on your account is you I have something to say. I am white, but I want to become a coach in the inner city that is not white, so I will have that same underdog feeling people of other races have that is tended as the underdog. The situation can not be underestimated. If a white person enters an inner city school where White is the minority they are the "underdog."

Mkadoza
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There are certain facial

There are certain facial structures we associate with race, that doesnt mean that facial features are some kind of genetically determined factors. They are hereditary.

Why wouldn't I consider them white? They're white skinned arent they? The guy at the top left looks a lot like my Russian (like born is Russia) friend Sergey. This is what I mean. People see what they want, and were supposed to define "race" on what? Facial features arent mutually exclusive.

No one is denying that individuals look different. However, I've seen too many "pure black" people with "asian eyes and facial shape" or white people that are a tan away from looking black to think that race, appearance, or any external factor means ANYTHING!

And race is a social creation period. And "Jew" is a religion, Israeli is a nationality. And I know plenty of Jews that support a free Palestine, and visa versa. These are the kinds of people that the world needs, not ones who insist on accentuating differences that make not a lick of difference to anything but the perception of someone who expects race to mean something.

tli232
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Re; Mkadoza

Dude, I can understand what you are saying, but you had a FACEPALM moment because......

GENETICS IS THE STUDY OF HEREDITY

facepalm

RUDEBOY
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LOL..Isn't it funny..how we

LOL..Isn't it funny..how we all come to this site almost everyday and read what other posters have written..And sometimes we agree & sometimes we disagree on different opinions..And we never ask the other poster whut their nationality is? Becuz we share their beliefs in the love of basketball..lol...Why can't it be like that in real life?...

knicksfan7
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RUDEBOY

Basketball is the universal language. Nationality, race, gender, income, etc doesn't matter. Remember that gatorade commercial where they say 10 feet on the east side is 10 feet on the west side. That's what this site represents basically. You can be from China or New York or Italy but the love for basketball is the same. Basketball = Life.

tli232
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Re: Knicksfan7.... again

Ok.... this brings me to another point; you would be more excited for the guy playing on YOUR TEAM. This is also an exhibition of "SIMILAR TO ME" bias. You would be more excited for the guy you identify with YOUR TEAM. I'm not trying to make this ALL about race. It's just that we identify with people who we have a connection to. In the theoretical case, "You like your team, and Muslim Player X plays for your team. You feel a connection to him, hence you are more excited for him"

In your case, it's simply a matter of you valuing your connection to the player's team higher than you valuing your connection to the player's race. All in all, it's still a matter of being more interested in people similar to ourselves.

BTW, I don't understand why people just think Jews are from Israel. If you're from a complete line of Jewish Mothers, then yes, most likely, your ethnicity is most likely Israeli.

Are you a reform Jew or an classically defined Jew? Because if you're the latter, then you have Israeli blood in you.

sheltwon3
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Knicksfans-- I understand

Knicksfans-- I understand where you are coming from and in no way did i say anything against it. There

are always going to be situation where people of any race can be the underdawg. I am a Saints fan and

a fan of Drew Brees who to my knowledge is white. He is a underdawg player because people get on

him for his height for being a quarterback and Chargers let him go for basically nothing. I connect with

Tim Teabow who is white but he is a fellow Christian and is not afraid to share his views. I don't get to

caught up in race because there will be no different races come judgment day and I am pretty sure I

mentioned where all the different races and what not started and if you read the bible you understand

why it all happen.

knicksfan7
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sheltwon

I understand you, I did not mean to make my post sounding like you're against it. You seem like a good dude who knows his stuff about the world and basketball.

sheltwon3
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How did i get a negative

How did i get a negative point. I did not say anything bad or offensive well i guess it was the Christian thing. Well to each his own but If that part about me makes you upset then maybe you need to check yourself and not me give yourself minus points.

DWadeBIW
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Sheltwon

nah i think someone is going around n giving minus points to everyone cuz i see that's been happening and started a few days ago :/

butidonthavemoney
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Haha

How has that guy not been banned???

Not complaining. I love him. He's always been one of my favorite posters.

tli232
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Banning vs. Not banning

If he genuinely believes it, I 100% support him in his views. I mean, he's being true to his heart. He believes that people like him are superior, and I can see where he might be coming from. People just get so sensitive when it comes to race.

If I said I only supported and cheered for 5'8", 205 SFs with 31 inch Verticals wearing headbands (me) because they are superior, it's the same concept as what Badger Guy said.

Critically Thinking
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I actually find myself

I actually find myself cheering for the opposite race more. Im a caucassian but most of my favorite players in sports seem to be other races. (Stanley Robinson, Robinson Cano, Anthony Kim, Josh Smith, Brandon Jacobs) I just like players that are exciting which dont seem to be white people in any sport except tennis and hockey.

uknation
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Yep. Can't lie. same out of

Yep. Can't lie. same out of sports like voting (rarely do I have a viable candidate of my race though but one won this past election)

Zubby
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Certian nationalites will

Certian nationalites will show favoritism, when Linsanity happen most the East Asians hear at my Uni were wearing Lin shirts, and they always seemed to rag on Melo.

Latinos do this a lot too imo, just from my experiences also at my Uni.

Whereas I'd say most W. African don't do this unless its international competition... there are tons of Nigerians in the NBA all Igbo and I cheer for them, cause they don't play for my team.

Hale
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Hell no. I root against

Hell no. I root against players of my color.

darkman97
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I use to do it more when I was younger

First off, I am black. And I must admit, I have cheered on African Americans in certain sports. More when I was younger than now. Growing up in Indiana, I was a big Minnesota Vikings fan, people always asked why Minnesota? Told them I liked the colors. Everyone assumed I meant the Purple and Gold, but I was more talking about the BLACK coaches (Denny Green and Tony Dungy) and the BLACK QB's (Moon, Cunningham, and Culpepper) Back when there weren't many African Americans in those positions, it was refreshing to see something so rare. Same as when Tiger started with golf and the Williams sisters in tennis. I cheered them just because we were broadening our scope into other fields. I've never cheered for a black basketball player based on his race or a black running back or wide receiver.

JoeWolf1
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No, my favorite NBA and NFL

No, my favorite NBA and NFL players have always been black.

I do like to see pro white players showcasing athletic ability. My vert has been over been over 30'' since I was 13 and peaked at 36'' in my early 20's, I just get sick of hearing how un athletic white guys are so I was rooting for Chase Budinger in the dunk contest, even though he ended up sucking, lol.

bobbyb
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Newsflash There is no such

Newsflash

There is no such thing as racism!!! It is a media/government tool used to divide the masses. Yes, there are hateful racist groups out there like the KKK and the Black Panthers. These groups only represent a small percent of the population. It is like when you a video on the news of the middle easterns burning the American flag. The group might only be a few thousand or even a few hundred. Does that mean you can generalize millions of people in the middle east by saying that they hate America?? Didnt think so.

Nbanflguy
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Race doesnt mean anything to

Race doesnt mean anything to me. Here is just a small sample size off the top of my head of hometown players I root or have rooted for: Randy Moss, Daunte Culpepper, Michael Bennet, Toby Gerhart, Antoine Winfield, Joe Webb, Cris Carter, Jared Allen, Adrian Peterson, Brett Favre, Tarvaris Jackson, Christian Ponder, Kevin Love, Kevin Garnett, Sam Cassell, Ricky Rubio, Michael Beasley, Latrell Sprewell, Joe Mauer, Justin Morneau, Johan Santana, Francisco Liriano, Brad Radke, Joe Nathan, Torii Hunter, Denard Span, Michael Cuddyer, Jason Kubel, Jim Thome, Marion Barber, Eric Decker, Adam Webber, Marques Gray, Laurence Maroney, Blake Hoffarber, Trevor Mwabke, Rodney Williams, Lawrence Westbrook, Lawrence Mackenzie, etc, ect, etc.

joecheck88
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That league could be my only

That league could be my only shot of playing professionally. Lol. I think we sometimes put toouch emphasis on race and don't enjoy the product enough. It was fun basketball to watch a kid that bounced around NBA teams and the D League come in and dominate. It didn't matter to me that he was Asian. It's great to see a John Lucas come in for a MVP and put up a 25 8 & 8 game. It's fun to watch a guy look real young in a streetb all match and dominate(professor). It's just really fun to watch.

aamir543
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If there is ever an Indian

If there is ever an Indian basketball player he will instantly become my favorite player, but that doesn't mean I'll turn a blind eye to skill and say he's better than MJ or anything.

It all depends, but if an Indian player played for the Lakers instead of my Warriors, I might root for him to do well, but that doesn't mean I'd root for the Lakers over my Dubs.

Wahoo757
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Yes, generally I root for

Yes, generally I root for players of my own race, especially in basketball where the number of white playerd are dwindling. I don't think there's anything wrong with people rooting for their own race, say an African American rooting for a black quarterback (Cam Newton, Mike Vick) or a Japanese supporting a Japanese MLB player (Ichiro). As long as their is no ill-will towards people of other races, like for instance me hoping Isaiah Thomas breaks his leg so Jimmer can get more minutes, than rooting for your own race is perfectly fine.

Grandmama
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Nope, not one bit. However,

Nope, not one bit. However, I do root for Americans in individual sports like golf or tennis.

How did this thread get bumped when it's more than two years old?

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