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Jeremy Tyler

dwilks101586
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Jeremy Tyler

does anyone agree with jeremy tyler decision to go pro after his Jr. year of high school. I think Jennings started something bad not only bad for college basketball but also bad for kids that think they dont need their education an go overseas an wait for the draft. So what if they get injured and be done then what? So I 100% disagree with his decision.


MagikKnick
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Yeah....he has NOTHING to

Yeah....he has NOTHING to fall back on...
Atleast Jennings got his High School diploma....
There definetly sending a wrong message to kids...
I actually like his game, and im not the type of person to say this...but i hope he doesnt succeed
If he does, and becomes a really big star...then dropping out of HS to "go pro" will soon become a common thing

and that wont be pretty...

Blazermann
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i dont

i dont think people would really follow them ,but if he does do good it might happen
i hope he does well and im not the type of person to wish bad things about people that are doin things they love.
this might be blessin u never kno

JoeWolf1
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IMO

I think it be the same kind of situation as the influx of high school players declaring for the draft from 95-2005. I am a huge advocate of college basketball, but my bias set aside, I think you will have great success stories like you had for high schoolers declaring such as Kobe, Lebron, Howard. However, I think you will have young players who will as you mentioned, get hurt and or just not be cut out for the NBA. There were dozens of high schoolers who declared for the draft, weren't drafted and faded into obscurity. I think Jennings will be a success story of someone who opted for Europe over college, but I think there will be a number of failures, whether Tyler is one only time will tell, but I think this trend will continue, especially for players who have trouble meeting the eligibility requirements of division 1 schools, and do not want to take the Ju-co route. I can't say I blame Jeremy Tyler for making this decision, but I do have a problem with agents trying to convince young athletes to make the jump for their own financial benefit, when it is not necessarily the best move for the player. I guess only time will tell, but I think for every success, there will be two failures.

Blazermann
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dont kno

what doe imo mean

JoeWolf1
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in my opinion

in my opinion

sheltwon3
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Why should basketball be any

Why should basketball be any different that any other phases of life. Jeremy Tyler actually has stuff to fall back on. He is smart and if he did not play ball, he could take over his father's business. Obviously anytime someone does something different you will have people follow them and some will not be successful. You can't put what other people do on Jeremy Tyler. He made a move that will help him. Also If I could make the kind of money that he is making at 17, That may be more money than I ever accumulated in my life and I am 29 and I was in the military for 7 years and had some various odd jobs. I think we as people need to understand that you have young people that went to college got a degree and are not getting hired. Jeremy Tyler took a opportunity to go over seas make money and also. Let's say the NBA has a lock out. Jeremy Tyler is good. Also in an article, he said he would get his GED and with the money he is making and also with a lot of free time he should have over there, he can do that and also get an associate in business online.

TheFactionCoali...
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Do you remember your seniot year of HS?

Tyler got his diploma...
Plus do you have any idea what his class schedule would have looked like? Since he already had fulfilled graduation requirements he would have had like 3 classes that are all a waste of time.
It's like saying kids shouldn't graduate early and go to college at a younger age. He graduated early. He didn't drop out, he didn't get his GED, he graduated early. Has his HS diploma like most of the country. What he's doing may be different from the norm, but it makes an INCREDIBLE amount of sense. It takes the masses awhile to get use to change, to accept something different. Just think about it. How many successful people say it's all about taking that risk, making that plunge? This is as calculated a risk as you can ever make in your life. Think of it from his perspective:
My goal is to make it to the NBA. I want to give myself the best opportunities possible to make it there.
I can play HS ball as a senior against awful talent that will not allow me to expand my game. I then will go to college for a year or two and get drafted.
OR
I can graduate early, showing I planned ahead and am not incapable of graduating, go overseas and see an entirely different culture, get paid like an adult, AND play against far better talent. If I fall on my ass I probably wouldn't have made it very far in college as a player anyway. I have at least 2 years to get used to this league and tap my potential. I will be getting paid so I won't feel the need to enter the draft when I'm not ready, especially over money concerns. I will get better coaching, learn from teammates, and if all of it fails, I will still be very young and can still go to college with the experience of being overseas.

So if you were weighing these options out in your mind, where would you go? Would you follow the age old, go to college road? Or at a time in our country where college is becoming less and less relevant to everyone would you take a new, creative option?

Blazermann
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wow

Very well spoken faction i wish i can give u more points

JoeWolf1
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I hear what you are saying

I hear what you are saying Faction, and Tyler seems to be a player ready to do this, but I think a lot of other players will follow suit despite the fact they are not ready. KG, Kobe, and Jermaine O'Neal were some of the first players since Moses Malone to make the jump from high school to the NBA, and its evident by their successes that they were indeed ready for the jump. I think Jennings would have been drafted at an equal position if he went to Arizona, and Tyler seems to have thought out his decision. However, I think agents will push players that are not necessarily as prepared to make the jump to europe the same way they do today with NCAA underclassmen and formerly high school prospects. Have you ever taken a look at the whole list of underclassmen who declare every year? I am a big time follower of NCAA basketball and I've never heard of a lot of the guys who are forfeiting their college eligibility and then are not drafted. Like I said, I can't blame Tyler, but I expect this new trend to be exploited by agents trying to make a dollar, and I don't think every player over there is going to be a Jennings or a Tyler, I think you will have plenty of DeAngelo Collins, and Lenny Cooke's too

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I think that the player

I think that the player should be able to do this if and only if the player isnt college material. Meaning they're not a college level student and they want to play ball and not have to go to school. To me Brandon Jennings was the perfect type of person for the leap. He didnt seem like a college guy, and the fact that he couldnt pass the SAT's made that clear in a way to me. It was clear he wasnt a college student, but it was also clear he was a God-gifted basktball player who didnt need school to do what he was destined to do. Idk if Tyler was or wasnt a college guy, but it seems like he did what he did because he was bored with HS ball. I would say he shouldve played and got ready for college ball, but hey, whatever floats his boat. He now has money in his pockets for playing a sport he's gifted at. I aint mad at em!

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I think that the player

I think that the player should be able to do this if and only if the player isnt college material. Meaning they're not a college level student and they want to play ball and not have to go to school. To me Brandon Jennings was the perfect type of person for the leap. He didnt seem like a college guy, and the fact that he couldnt pass the SAT's made that clear in a way to me. It was clear he wasnt a college student, but it was also clear he was a God-gifted basktball player who didnt need school to do what he was destined to do. Idk if Tyler was or wasnt a college guy, but it seems like he did what he did because he was bored with HS ball. I would say he shouldve played and got ready for college ball, but hey, whatever floats his boat. He now has money in his pockets for playing a sport he's gifted at. I aint mad at em!

Slim
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I think

I think we should look at size, strength, and versatility
Jennings stands out because of his freakish athleticism and ability to get into the lane and make a pass

Brandon Roy came out if high school and was about to declare as a small forward
but he went to college and now he can play point guard, shooting guard, and small forward

I think GMs should look at versatility and IQ not only 1-dimensional players someone can make a 3 (Redick) or a flashy crossover/pass (Telfair)
GMs should look at who is playing in the league at that position and what skills are needed to stand out at that position
Jeremy Tyler should learn how to play ala Tim Duncan (hook shot and college 3 pt range) and not like Tyson Chandler (dunks)

FT33
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Jeremy Tyler

What he did had many pros and cons. The thing I am mad about is the fact that he signed a one-year, $140,000 contract. For someone who is supposed to be one of the best players in his class and someone who is compared to Amar'e, you think he would get more money.

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