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Why is it possible that players can play better in NBA than in college right after they enter in the league

ggyy
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Why is it possible that players can play better in NBA than in college right after they enter in the league

I have been thinking about this question for a long time. How is it possible for some players to play better or keep up the same stat as they did in college right after they enter the NBA?

For example, D.Rose averaged about 14 points per game in Memphis, but in his first NBA season, he could average 16.8 while everyone he played with and against is much better? I just sometimes don't understand how it works. If you can score 20 pts per game in a place where your teammates are much better at scoring and have higher status in the team, and your opponents are taller, stronger,more athletic, and better at defending, why couldn't you score like 30ish every night a year ago in college, where about only 60 people can continue to play pro?


The8thDeadlySin
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Yes. Simple answer is

Yes. Simple answer is coaching and freedom.

The8thDeadlySin
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Yes. Simple answer is

Yes. Simple answer is coaching and freedom.

JunkYardDog
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not the same way of

not the same way of playing... faster, less system and coaching in nba than in ncaa, more iso, more individual defense.

better teammates too....

omphalos
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Statistically, it also comes

Statistically, it also comes down to the shorter shot-clock and the extra time in the pro-game. More possessions mean more shots, and the defensive 3-second rule also means more opportunities to score in the paint.

Also, there are a lot more defensive specialists in the backcourt in college than the NBA, some of the best perimeter defenders in college have been passed over for players who could score the ball or who were more athletic, even if they didn't know how to use it.

Where Aaron Craft gets drafted is going to be interesting, because he's a very canny defender, even if he's a step slow.

sammybuckeye13
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Time, for one

You also can't underestimate the difference in speed and overall game time that comes with a 24-second clock and 8-minute longer game. Not only are the games longer, but the pace of play can strongly influence how many players perform.

mikeyvthedon
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Style of play/role

Grant Hill comes to mind as well, going from 17.4 ppg as a senior at Duke to 19.9 as a NBA rookie with Detroit. The NBA is definitely a more fast paced game and in actuality, these guys might not be scoring more points per minute as they were in college (though Grant Hill was). In the case of Derrick Rose, he also had a junior in Chris Douglas-Roberts who greatly benfited from playing next to him. Chris shot 54% from the field and was the main offensive option.

Even in Derrick's first year in Chicago, when it was becoming quite obvious the team was his, he still deferred to Ben Gordon and than later on John Salmons at times. Also, while it is true that maybe only 50 or so (lets count International players being drafted into the NBA as well) make the NBA every year from college, there are a lot who stay and eventually make it. There are also numerous great players and eventual pro's. I mean, simply put, Derrick Rose did not have to score 30 points per game for his team to be effective.

Derrick's team made the NCAA Finals and he had an absolute killer of a Final 4 game against a UCLA team with Darren Collison and Russell Westbrook. Than, he had a very solid Final game against a Kansas team with a number of future NBA Draft picks (including the older Mario Chalmers and Sherron Collins in the back court), but missed some crucial FT's to finish things off.

When you look at guys who have had monster freshman years scoring, their teams actually have rarely been competitive threats. Kevin Durant and Michael Beasley both scored mounds of points, averaging double digit rebounds. But, there teams each lost double digit games and both took a while to score even close to what they did at the college level, with Durant obviously being more equipped.

It is about the team you have and the system you run. If it were as simple as handing Derrick Rose the ball at Memphis and saying "go nuts", than chances are it would happen. But, it is not that simple and balanced teams tend to win NCAA championships. There are always star players on those teams that have a big impact, but remember that these are also developing players who are (at least) 5 months removed from the NCAA before they play another NBA game. That is a lot of time to work out and get better, especially as you are doing so at a professional level.

surve
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there are several easy

there are several easy answers to that question.

  • Style - the style of NBA play allows players who are good one-on-one to excel because they dont have to face the defenses. Sure, you can double team, but you cant win titles in the NBA by double teaming because you have too many high calibur players that make you pay.
  • Pace - the pace is tailor made for most players, whether you are an athletic freak or a spot up shooter. There are much easier opportunities to score in transition....main reason being, even if you had a PG who sucks in the NBA, he still would dominated in college. Not every PG has the best vision but at this level everyone can handle and pass at least moderately.
  • Defense - in college, zone masks a lot of player's deficiencies but it also holds others back. Defense during the regular season is not played at a super-high level as in the postseason. Plus you cant just camp out in the lane if you are a big man. In college Westbrook wasnt as effective as he is in the pros because if he can get through the zone someone is waiting to take the charge, in the NBA, once he beats his man, the defense is at his mercy. He is so fast that its hard to rotate in time to stop him without fouling.
  • Isolation - this allows players to get to the line much more frequently than in college because there isnt much iso like that without collapse. when you have great spacing to do iso work in, its hard to stop an offensive force from scoring. that usually leads to free throws.
  • Offense - even if a player doesnt have many plays drawn up for him he can still be a terrific scorer...look at Ilyasova this year, he hits the glass, shoots the 3, and gets good looks because of the focus not being on him. People say Harrison Barnes may be a 3rd option in the NBA. Think about that. If Barnes is a 3rd option, imagine what 1 and 2 look like. A scorer like Barnes could reak havoc if he had 2 other players that were the primary focus.
  • Hard working athletes - a lot of guys are lazy in the league...others...lack intensity and focus...some are disinterested when it comes to basketball, due to burnout or what have you...or some are just playing because they have leeches that they support. this leaves room for guys like MKG to come in and do some great work just because of their passion, athleticism, and enthusiasm for the game. You saw that with Faried this year. If you work hard you can be as good if not better than you were in college.
Meditated States
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Better teamates is huge

Zones are not as effective cause everyone can shoot. No zones lead to pick and roll and pick and pop. Iso,further 3 point line means your help D is far away the D is spread. Austin Rivers will be a problem. Quick shots are a must 24 second clock. 3 second violation makes for a open lane more often no camping out. Coaches know how to use guys better and play to their strengths not a system as much.

Meditated States
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Better teamates is huge

Zones are not as effective cause everyone can shoot. No zones lead to pick and roll and pick and pop. Iso,further 3 point line means your help D is far away the D is spread. Austin Rivers will be a problem. Quick shots are a must 24 second clock. 3 second violation makes for a open lane more often no camping out. Coaches know how to use guys better and play to their strengths not a system as much.

TheArtistPaysth...
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What surve said

plus minutes per game and development. U started by saying Rose scored 14 at Memphis then 16 for Bulls. But a year later it was 25 for Bulls. Thats a even bigger jump.What changed from year one with Bulls to year two. He got better. A good college game may be 75 to 68. That's terrible in the league.

TheArtistPaysth...
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Look at Westbrook

everybody thought it was a stretch at 4 in 08. He didnt even play point guard at UCLA. The Sonics ended up being right in the end.

Mel
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Faster pace = More

Faster pace = More possessions, more shots.

Also more space on the floor to attack

Onions
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Spacing

Spacing is big. More room in the paint because of the extended 3pt line and in the pros, all your wings can shoot (or usually can). In college you can teams that can continually collaspe on the big and not worry about the other team making wideopen 3pt shots.

Look at UNC. They had their bigs double and tripled teams at times, their wings had trouble making outside shots, and therefore everytime Barnes drove to the rim, he was met by his guy, Henson's guy, Zeller's guy, and the guy sagging off Kendall or Dex or even Bullock and PJ sometimes.

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