share

Why Don't The Top Prospects Do What Larry Legend Did?

don042488
don042488's picture
Registered User
Joined: 12/03/2008
Posts: 655
Points: -2067
Online
Why Don't The Top Prospects Do What Larry Legend Did?

Alot of the top prospects are turning down the opportunity to be high picks in a weak draft, to go back to college...I'm not all that mad at their decision because I hate when players come out of school too early and their so unpolished and raw, to produce at all, in the NBA...With that said, what Harrison Barnes, Jared Sullinger, and Perry Jones, all could have done, was still enter the draft, without signing an agent, or accepting money from anyone to travel, for the draft workouts, in this way they could still get drafted high, and go back to school...At least in this way, their drafted already, and can't ruin their stock, by playing poorly or getting injured...The last player to do this, was former Kentucky center, Randolph Morris...Only difference is, he never got drafted, so when he went back to school, it was only to better his game, with no assurance of landing on an NBA team...But then decided to give the NBA another try, by playing in the D-League, until eventually he was signed as a free agent, by the Knicks, March 23, 2007.


mikeyvthedon
mikeyvthedon's picture
Registered User
Joined: 06/13/2008
Posts: 5621
Points: 13317
Offline
You can't do that anymore Don

Otherwise, you might see it being done. If a player does not pull out of the draft by the early entry deadline, they are not eligible to go back to school. I do not know why, I do not know if I agree with it, but it is quite present. One of the last players I remember being drafted and than going back to school was Voshon Lenard (46th pick by the Bucks in 1994). However, I believe starting in 1995, NCAA players had to give up their remaining years of eligibility if they are indeed drafted into the NBA.

One of the first few lines here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBA_Draft

ilmago
Registered User
Joined: 06/20/2009
Posts: 46
Points: 114
Offline
Yep..

it is not allowed, as Mike said. However, I do agree with your point. If I was one of them I would get drafted and possibly, if I feel like I am not ready to play in the NBA quite yet, go overseas in a mid-league team where I am sure I get playing time against professional and tough competitors. Then they can come back in one or two years with money in the bank and a whole lot of experience.

don042488
don042488's picture
Registered User
Joined: 12/03/2008
Posts: 655
Points: -2067
Online
Sorry, Your Wrong

You can still do it, Randolph Morris like I said, did it, and still went back to school, only thing is, he wasn't drafted...Even if he did get drafted, he would've still been eligible to play in college...It would'nt be right for the NBA to stop that, while overseas players could get drafted, and remain overseas for years, until they come to America, and join the team that holds their rights, ala Ricky Rubio, Fran Vasquez, Manu Ginobli, Luis Scola, and etc So that option is still in play

ilmago
Registered User
Joined: 06/20/2009
Posts: 46
Points: 114
Offline
I am pretty sure...

...you lose your college eligibilty when you hire an agent. You can't go back to school after that unless you go undrafted, make a formal request and that gets accepted by the NCAA.

don042488
don042488's picture
Registered User
Joined: 12/03/2008
Posts: 655
Points: -2067
Online
To ilamgo:

Right, u do lose elgibility when u sign with an agent, but that's what I'm saying, for players that "DON'T" hire an agent, or accept money for anyone to travel for workouts, there still eligible to go back to school

mikeyvthedon
mikeyvthedon's picture
Registered User
Joined: 06/13/2008
Posts: 5621
Points: 13317
Offline
Don

I remember the Morris situation. He was not drafted. Hence, how is that like Larry Legend? If you get drafted by an NBA team, you can not go back to college. Name me one instance of that happening since 1995, where a player is drafted and goes back to college. Randolph Morris still had to fight to come back and play at Kentucky, and once he finally left, he was able to go straight to the NBA since he had already entered the draft. If Harrison Barnes, Perry Jones III and Jared Sullinger entered the draft, they would definitely be picked. Plus, I believe the new rule is, that if you do not pull out by a certain date, you give up your remaining eligibility.

It is a cool concept, no doubt, that Larry Bird was picked by the Celts and got to finish college, but under the current rules of the draft and NBA, it is not happening anymore, agentless or otherwise. Blame the league, blame the NCAA, but this is the current reality. Hate to say this, but they could not have done it.

don042488
don042488's picture
Registered User
Joined: 12/03/2008
Posts: 655
Points: -2067
Online
To Mikeyvthedon:

Larry Bird was the first player to do it, he got drafted by the Celtics, and went back to school, to try to win a championship...That's how comes the Celtics ended up getting Kevin McHale the following year because their team had still sucked, so when Bird did join them, he joined them with a fellow lottery pick, in Mchale

TallmanNYC
TallmanNYC's picture
Registered User
Joined: 05/04/2010
Posts: 2117
Points: 1192
Offline
This would have to be an NCAA

This would have to be an NCAA rule (obviously the NBA can't tell the NCAA who can play or who can't). I don't see what the NCAA gains by having this rule. It would be great for the NCAA if some players stayed longer at college even though the had been drafted. I assume the NCAA feels like this would soil the "amature" aspect of the college game, but don't we all feel like the NCAA is kidding itself in regards to any of the top talents really being amature players?

That said, it would be real tough to turn down a guaranteed contract after you have been drafted to go back to school and continue playing for a college scholarship to a state school. What is that worth? $30k a year when you talk about room and board? So rule or no rule, I think the money in the NBA is too great now for anyone who gets drafted to do this.

the microwave
Registered User
Joined: 07/17/2009
Posts: 666
Points: 465
Offline
After a solid debut in his

After a solid debut in his first year at Kentucky, Morris decided to declare for the 2005 NBA draft but did not hire an agent. He averaged 8.8 points per game and 4.2 rebounds. Despite playing well for Kentucky and starting every game but one, he did not prove himself NBA ready and often got in foul trouble. Morris went undrafted and decided to attempt a return to Kentucky. The NCAA agreed to reinstate him, but not before sitting out the first half of the 2005-2006 season. Morris returned to Kentucky in January 2006, but could not help the team get out of its season-long slump. Nevertheless, he improved in almost every statistical category from his freshman year and was very impressive at times. As a sophomore, he averaged 13.3 points and 6 rebounds per game. In his junior season Morris made further progress, averaging 16.1 points, 7.8 rebounds and 2.1 blocks per game, earning first team All-SEC honors.

Real Talk Real ...
Registered User
Joined: 01/15/2009
Posts: 131
Points: 116
Offline
randolph

randolph morris getting some love... guy is a bum though. Has the size and tools to be a pro and good player, but he is lazy.

mikeyvthedon
mikeyvthedon's picture
Registered User
Joined: 06/13/2008
Posts: 5621
Points: 13317
Offline
Don

You are wrong man. I am guessing you more than likely did no research on the rule or read what I had posted to explain it, but, here is something:

"The Boston Celtics selected the 6'9", 220-pound Bird 6th overall in the 1978 NBA Draft, even though they were uncertain whether he would enter the NBA or remain at Indiana State to play his senior season. Bird ultimately decided to play his final college season, but the Celtics retained their exclusive right to sign him until the 1979 NBA Draft, because of the NBA's "junior eligible" rule that existed at that time (allowing a collegiate player to be drafted when the player's original "entering" class was graduating and giving them one calendar year to sign them, even if they went back to college). Shortly before that deadline, Bird agreed to sign with the Celtics for a US $650,000 a year contract, making him at the time the highest-paid rookie in the history of the NBA. Shortly afterwards, the NBA draft eligibility rules were changed to prevent teams from drafting players before they were ready to sign. The rule is called the Bird Collegiate Rule."

-Taken from the first paragraph on Larry Bird's wikipedia page. (I know, they are not always right, but they look good here)

So, while it may be something cool to do in theory, it is flat out not done in practice. Research is always good. You could say, "it would be cool if they could do it", but not, "they should do it because they can do it". The latter is not true.

Also, yes, the Celtics did suck the year before Larry Bird "went back to school to win a championship" (though, I do not think that was the only reason he went back to school having read a lot about Larry Bird), but they received Kevin McHale and Robert Parrish through a trade with the Golden State Warriors, hence making their monster front court and subsequent history of three more Celtic titles. Plus, their was no NBA lottery until 1985. So, while Kevin McHale was the 3rd pick, and that would generally be lottery territory, the "lottery" back than was a coin flip between the two worst teams.

Not only that, but Kevin McHale actually came to the team the year after the Celtics finished with the best record in the league, Larry's rookie year. The Celtics had traded Bob McAdoo for ML Carr and two first round picks the Detroit Pistons possessed in the 1980 draft. In this incredibly lopsided trade, the Celtics, who had finished 61-21 in the 1979-80 season, Larry's first in the league, had the 1st and 13th picks. Than, they decided to trade the first pick, Joe Barry Carroll, to Golden State for a young center named Robert Parrish and Golden State's third pick in the draft, Kevin McHale. So, you should probably check your facts man.

RSS: Syndicate content