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Whatever happened to the love of competition

Dr.Red
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Whatever happened to the love of competition

One thing I used to love about the NBA was the fierce rivalries and competition. Guys didn't want to team up and play with their rivals. Guys like Jordan and Magic and Larry all wanted to kill their competition. Granted, they were on top-notch teams, but they also would have never teamed up to win. Superteams were formed by shrewed management decisions, not by pouting brats that want to play with their friends.

Could you imagine Michael pulling a move to join Detroit in free agency because his Bulls couldn't get past the Pistons in his early years? Hell no. He worked and worked and worked and busted on his teammates until they could beat Detroit. Hell, we're still hearing stories about how much guys on the Dream Team hated each other. Players took losing personally and wanted to prove their worth. I really miss those days.

The league is really losing its luster with all these egotistical brats, who think they are entitled to something they haven't earned, and are apparently running things these days. If I was an owner, I would put an end to that - at least, do the best I could to prevent that. I would tell a player, "If you sign this contract, keep your mouth shut and work your butt off. I don't want to hear a damned trade demand. Got it?!" I would do the same for a player I was going to draft. Lay it all out for them. If they don't like it, there is the door.


I May Be Krypt
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There is a theme song to the

There is a theme song to the recent NBA. Here's your answer

Honestly, it's gotta be about the $$$.. Stern wants to maximize profits to the fullest and if that means having 5-6 super teams in great markets, then unfortunately, that's what we'll have to deal with. Players are so pampered now that it's crazy! But I could say that about all sports actually but yeah, it's crazy. BUT with all that said, I'm still gunna watch and be a fan because I'm addicted lol

mikeyvthedon
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Dude

I kind of feel you to an extent, but there is still definite competition. Those players also had fewer teams to weigh down the competition, not to mention were built incredibly well. Here was something I wrote a while back when people were going "Well, Magic, Michael and Larry would NEVER do that":

http://nbadraft.net/forum/lopsided-moves-made-champions

Magic got drafted by a team that had the best player in the league (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, MVP during Magic's rookie season, his 6th. One might say "he was 32", but he was still pretty damn dominant. For quite a while afterwards, as well). I mean, Magic won a title in 1981-82, than the Lakers picked first in the draft (James Worthy). Yes, Magic was an incredible player and a definite competitor/champion, but circumstances were pretty sweet.

Larry Bird was also an incredible player and competitor. Nonetheless, Larry's team got the first pick in the draft after a rookie season he lead them to 61 wins (playing with HOF guys at their twilight in Dave Cowens/Tiny Archibald, along with an excellent forward named Cedric Maxwell. Heck, they even had Pistol Pete for 26 games for good measure). They traded this for a Hall of Fame front court in Robert Parrish and Kevin McHale. They were a brilliantly run franchise and had pieces that guys you are probably referring to as being let downs would only dream of.

Michael Jordan is a case where he did have some fortuitous circumstances, yet took much longer to build towards a championship. Magic and Larry won their rings quickly, whereas Michael had to take some time to build a team, eventually winning more than either did individually. Still, he is Michael Jordan. Let's face it, he is one of a kind. He never averaged less than 29.3 ppg in a play-off season. He had an excellent sidekick, some great defenders/rebounders and one of the better (if not best) coach in NBA history.

Still, if these guys had not been able to get it done, would they have not looked for better players? Did Michael Jordan never get pissed off at certain teammates and hope for a better supporting cast? I tend to believe that while these guys have a combined 14 rings amongst them, they also had quite a number of Hall of Fame contributors and good situations to help their cause.

Now, is the NBA still not incredibly competitive? I definitely believe so. This year, we had a number of teams we believed could be champions. Even with Miami (who seem to be the team accused of stacking the deck, which is justified to an extent), this league is still incredibly competitive and brings a lot of excitement. Egos? Always, they were there before. They were there when many of these same players were trying to get rights and freedoms they deserved in the 1998 lockout. I just tend to think that while many long for the good old days, times have changed and so have situations. So, one can say "these old greats were the REAL competitors", but do we know how they would react to the situation players are in nowadays? I tend to think that plays a role in these perceived attitudes of some modern NBA stars.

g4r43
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Battier, who benefited from

Battier, who benefited from once being a Houston teammate of Chinese star Yao Ming, has had a shoe deal the past seven years with Chinese company Peak. Television commercials featuring Battier run regularly in China, where the forward is known as Mr. President due to his dignified nature.

Dr.Red
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MikeyV

You make great points, as usual. Who am I to say the old guys wouldn't have teamed up in today's NBA?... The whole world is a different place. I still think some old school guys are more about proving they got what it takes than trying to form the most talented squad. KG could have left Boston - didn't. He didn't even want to leave Minny after all those rough years. Duncan never wanted to leave the Spurs. I don't think Dirk will chase another ring outside of Dallas, either. They are about loyalty and pride, and put the whole thing on them. If they can't win with who they got, they don't win. But I know they definitely do want rings more than anything. There is just something about that old school mentality that I like and respect. I don't really respect so-called superstars that chase rings - at least, not until the twilight of their careers. If you are a superstar, act like one and earn the ring. Don't try to stack a squad and steal it. But that is just this old man's opinion.

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“To be honest, I can’t think

“To be honest, I can’t think of one,” Drew said on if there is another backcourt in the league faster than the Hawks’ guard unit. “We can certainly get from one end of the floor to the other with the best of them. Jeff and Lou are two guys who are really good in the open floor and they certainly bring a tremendous amount of speed to the game.

PROBALLWA
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DWAGAAEEEA
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The 2012-2013 Celtics season

The 2012-2013 Celtics season is the first not to be powered by the Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen triumvirate since this whole crazy run kicked off. The new Big-3 era is over, and the Celtics have transitioned from a “Big 3” to a more complete team that will rely on significant contributions from more players as the two eldest statesmen, Garnett and Pierce, pare their minutes down in an effort to stay fresh and effective for eight grueling NBA months. And they are doing it behind a new leader.af323

DWAGAAEEEA
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His ascension to the role is

His ascension to the role is perhaps the biggest story line in Boston. Doc Rivers has said it. Danny Ainge has said it. So have Garnett and Pierce. Everyone in Green is making sure the world knows that Rajon Rondo is the leader of this team. \oi[909

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“You can't knock the man's

“You can't knock the man's legacy, you can't knock what he's done in basketball," Parker told Hard 2 Guard Radio, as transcribed by Larry Brown Sports. "His work ethic is tremendous. There's not an ounce of hate in my blood whatsoever. The guy can play basketball -- you've seen that throughout his career.

PAIDUDU
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Coach Mike Brown has insisted

Coach Mike Brown has insisted he wouldn't be even slightly concerned if the revamped Los Angeles Lakers went winless in the preseason. After another blowout loss to Utah, nobody seemed worried the Lakers are halfway there.

saty342323
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“We’ve always liked Eddy,”

“We’ve always liked Eddy,” Nelson continued. “He’s got soft hands and he’s got a nice low-post game. He’s gone on some hard times at the age of 29 and, with a family, people grow up. He’s put in a lot of work this summer and put himself in a great position. I think it was a numbers thing down in San Antonio, but we’re going to take a good hard look at him.”

saty342323
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And it’s that versatility

And it’s that versatility that is going to pay the biggest dividends for Green in 2011-12.

Green isn’t known as a great defender, but he did hold small forwards to a 7.8 Player Efficiency Rating while he was with the Celtics in 2011 (the league average is 15).

Green didn’t have much offensive success at either small forward (13.8 PER in 2010-11) or power forward (12.6), but that was before he really understood what Rivers wanted from him.

saty342323
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“We’ve always liked Eddy,”

“We’ve always liked Eddy,” Nelson continued. “He’s got soft hands and he’s got a nice low-post game. He’s gone on some hard times at the age of 29 and, with a family, people grow up. He’s put in a lot of work this summer and put himself in a great position. I think it was a numbers thing down in San Antonio, but we’re going to take a good hard look at him.”

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