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Thunder on Half Court Shots (Protecting Stats)

JoeyGladstone
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Thunder on Half Court Shots (Protecting Stats)

According to Elias, a halfcourter is attempted about 27 percent of the time to finish the first, second or third quarter (it’s rare you see a heave to finish the fourth). For the season, there have been 758 games played in the NBA total, meaning roughly 205 halfcourt heaves. And total, there have been three total halfcourt or beyond makes. Three. Crunch the numbers and that means the league is shooting roughly combined 0.01 percent from halfcourt and beyond.

Thunder Players.....KD surprises me.

Kevin Durant: “It depends on what I’m shooting from the field. First quarter if I’m 4-for-4, I let it go. Third quarter if I’m like 10-for-16, or 10-for-17, I might let it go. But if I’m like 8-for-19, I’m going to go ahead and dribble one more second and let that buzzer go off and then throw it up there. So it depends on how the game’s going.”

Russell Westbrook: “No. Nope … If I was considering about [statistics] I’d do a lot of **** different.”

Thabo Sefolosha: “Personally if I have it, I shoot it. I’ve seen players not shoot it at all, or seen players shoot it late. I’ve seen that before … [Brooks] did, he mentioned it. In the team, most of us, I think we take the shot. But you see players that don’t do it … You gotta count it [as a shot]. You gotta count it. It’s a shot. But who cares really. I don’t care about that kind of stuff. One more shot, make or miss, is not going to break or make me, so I shoot it.”

Eric Maynor: “I know people that do that, but I ain’t doing that. I’m trying to make it. But I’ve seen people do that a lot. Trying to act like they got the shot up but really know that ball didn’t get released. But you see it a lot in this league … It’s a shot. It’s a shot. If somebody shoot it, if you let it go, that’s a shot attempt so you can’t say that.”

These players nowadays are OBSESSED with personal stats.

http://dailythunder.com/2013/02/to-heave-or-not-heave/


TheArtistPaysth...
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Every professional basketball

Every professional basketball decision maker in the world is obsessed with stats and for good reasons.....besides maybe Bryan Colanglo.........., let's say the difference in Harden getting 55 million and 80 million, were his advanced metrics profile. Until someone comes up with a way to take away toss ups at the end of quarters, situations like being tossed the ball with 3 or less seconds on the shot clock, badly missed foul call shot attempts, etc. the players should worry about stats.

Hollinger might have deemed Rudy Gay expendable even if he made 12 million a season, not because Rudy Gay isn't a highly skilled special athlete and player but because his metrics sucked. When and if the players understand and use metrics to become better, as the coaches and GM's have already for the most part, they will be better for it. Lebron finally chose to post up smaller/weaker guys, blow by slower guys and shoot longer shots only when given space (because the opposing player is scared of him exercising his first two options) and in rhythm and optimize on easy run outs as a passer and finisher, all things backed up by metrics and or good coaching, he and his team is thriving.

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re: KD

Just a thought.. but maybe KD is saying if he is hot he is more likely to make it... You know the notion of the basket getting bigger and stuff.

I remember during the Olympics him & Melo would get hot from deep and then suddenly they would take one from WAYYY back.. and I just knew it was going in. Maybe that's similar to the kind of instance he's talking about.. I dunno.

Edit: Reading it again, the last but one sentence he says kinda disproves my theory.

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Quotes from Robert Pera, Griz owner

Pera on Rudy Gay:

"I was actually a big Rudy Gay fan. He was 6'9", over a 7-foot wing span with a 40-inch vertical, really smooth and athletic and on the highlights all the time. He was awesome. But like I said, going back to basketball and how it’s a team sport and all the pieces fit together, the offense we run is really traditional. It’s inside-outside, a grinding type of offense. Rudy’s talent, his potential really couldn’t be maximized in our system. I think it was good for him and I think it was good for the team. I think the pieces we got back were much stronger. I wouldn’t say the players we got back were necessarily better than Rudy. Rudy’s a special talent. But for our team and for our fit, I think the personnel and the team we have constructed now is probably the best Grizzlies team when you’re looking at the total team and chemistry and how it fits our style of play.”

Pera on the team's reliance on advanced metrics:

"Well, we like the movie "Moneyball." They use a lot of advanced statistics for the Oakland A's teams. But the difference between baseball and basketball, is (in) baseball, you have individual players, they each have an on-base percentage and a batting average, defensive capabilities. All these parts added together equals the strength of the team, right? But in basketball it's completely different. A player can be immensely valuable in one system and maybe not as valuable in another system. I think it's the combination of pieces in basketball. Analytics are a great tool but you also have to look at the individual player analytics in the context of the system you're running."

Via

http://www.hoopsrumors.com/

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