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A REAL top 40 draft ranking with worthwhile commentary

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A REAL top 40 draft ranking with worthwhile commentary

I'd like to hear what everyone has to say about my rankings/comments... more to be found at http://deanslistblog.blogspot.com

1) Ricky Rubio
Please bear with the argument. I love Griffin’s game as much as anyone, but a prospect like Rubio does not come around as often. Griffin has the potential to be a great player but Rubio has the potential to make every one on the floor with him great. His exceptional playmaking skills do not come around as often as very athletic, talented forwards (Beasley, Durant, Griffin). Pose this to a Utah Jazz fan; would you rather have John Stockton or Carlos Boozer. GMs can fill their rosters with scorers much easier than they can find a player with such unmatched decision making and passing skills to get those scorers the ball in a place to be effective. It’s not necessarily that Rubio is “better” than Griffin, it’s that the replacement cost/value is much higher. For someone 18 years of age, he has unbelievable court maturity, work ethic, unselfishness and coachability. Don’t let the foreign thing get you- he is an outstanding on the ball defender who will always get a hand in the face of a shooter, forcing opposing guards to shoot very poor percentages. He is a court-surveyor that sees plays develop before they occur.

2) Blake Griffin
With my appreciation for Rubio downgrading Griffin slightly, it should not be taken that Griffin is not a stellar prospect. He can become a player with Kenyon Martin-like physicality and rebounding on defense and Carlos Boozer-like offensive ability. Another thing that sets Griffin apart from highly touted forwards Martin, Durant & Beasley, is the sense that Griffin takes the profession a bit more seriously that these individuals. Martin has been labeled a party-goer, Durant is somewhat selfish with the rock and Beasley has been labeled as somewhat of a malcontent. Griffin has the attitude to fully realize his potential which is something that many draft prognosticators do not appreciate. And the talent is there- Griffin has offensive moves both facing and with his back to the basket, he is a smart player that moves and scores efficiently, he can handle the rock, fight for position and demonstrate fluid movements and balance. On the same play Griffin can take on contact with unmatched intensity, while finishing by the rim with coordination and soft hands.

3) DeJuan Blair
In my mind Blair could be a big sleeper in this draft. Many are worried about his height, but his wingspan more than makes up for the shortcoming. An absolute beast in the paint, Blair will give defenses fits trying to move him from under the basket. Blair makes quick, decisive moves to the basket and finishes well. Also- when looking to the draft, many attempt to place a weighted value on a players potential upside. What we forget to ignore is the weighted potential of the downside. Shoot-first-ask-questions-later guards have limitless downside (See Stephon Marbury). In Blair, there is very little chance that he does not end up as a productive NBA player. He will easily man the boards with his size and intensity. The star potential in Blair is mainly caught up in his ability to develop a jump shot that can create mismatches. Yet even if this skill does not develop, Blair will find a role within a team and excel at what a coach needs him to do. One worry I have about his defense is his lateral recovery on the wing against a pick-and-roll or set offense. Lastly, I strongly believe that wingspan is an underrated measurement and overall height can be slightly overrated. A tall player may have a long neck or torso; now tell me how that helps him playing ball? It is the length of your arms that pressures shooters and ball-handlers, and also separates from defenders when passing or looking for open space to score around the rim. Blair’s wingspan is that of a 7’2’’ individual- drop that line next time someone says he’s too small

4) Stephen Curry
Curry has unquestioned NBA 3-pt shooting ability far beyond the other PG prospects in this draft. He also dwarfs his competitors in the areas of maturity, basketball intelligence, winning mentality, unselfishness and work ethic. You may scoff at these ideas, but these are the areas that separate the draft steals from the draft busts. Rarely does Curry stand around, he is constantly moving to get free from defenders. Curry uses this movement to get open looks, create momentum to take efficient dribble moves to the basket as well as creating shots for others. It should be interesting to see Curry work within an offense that he does not so extremely exceed the talent level of his teammates. There should be no question that Curry will not adapt to the NBA and utilize his skills to help a winning team. I do question his distributive capabilities as an NBA PG -- not that I am sure he will be weak in this area, but he was never in a position to take on this responsibility at Davidson.

5) B. Jennings
From the game tape and scouting reports I have analyzed, Jennings is a very impressive player who gained a lot from playing a year in Italy. He seems to be able to be two completely different players; a southpaw, distributing shot-creator who uses his athletic ability to put others in excellent positions to score or a devastatingly explosive ball handler and scorer who has a burst that is impossible to stop. People say going to college matures a boy into a man, but the way some of the high profile programs are operated, they end up turning immature boys into even more immature, older boys. Jennings learned a lot, and matured vastly playing a year in Rome as was documented by the New York Times.

6) Ty Lawson
During tournament time, the media was hyped up on Lawson injury updates, and rightly so. Lawson was the true coach on the court for the championship winning heels. A team that is looking for improved transition play should look no further- Lawson’s end to end quickness, handling ability, and low propensity for turnover could instantly turn an NBA team’s ability to run the court effectively. Many question his size, but successful PGs do exist at this height. It takes a player with exceptional ability to make up for that size, however, and Lawson is that player. In college he shot 3s at a great clip, but it is questionable whether he will see that many attempts at the next level given his size. His offensive game will remain as a slasher and on the defensive end he will continue to be a pest to opposing handlers.

7) Hasheem Thabeet
Thabeet has the potential to be overdrafted this year. His offensive game is awkward, he does not catch the ball well enough to be fed the rock consistently, he runs out of gas easily and becomes less active up and down the court, he will likely be one of the worst side-to-side defenders in the game, he has a reputation of laziness and lack of basketball intelligence and doesn’t seem to be that concerned with creating shots for others through passing out of the post. With that said, it is hard to ignore a 7’3’’ specimen. His shotblocking potential is enormous and if utilized right, he should shoot at a phenomenally high percentage. His basketball development is still in the early stages and it is imperative that he ends up in a system that hones, nurtures and teaches Hasheem to be an effective team player.

8) Terrence Williams
There is a tendency to overlook Williams, a very effective player for an impressive Louisville squad. His excels in a variety of areas. He is both a great transition player and shooter, an excellent rebounder and passer. He displays a 6’9’’ wingspan and he takes on the ball defense very seriously. Again the idea of limited downside is apparent in Williams’ game. At the very least, he will still be a player who can lock down on defense as he has phenomenal side to side movement in a low defensive stance, and can not be left open beyond the arc on offense. His athleticism, arms, body control and strength all point to a player that could conceivably guard 3 different positions, and there is always room on the floor for one of those guys. Shot selection and a go-to move or two would help turn Williams into a star player..

9) James Harden
There is a lot to like about Hardens game but because I have him ranked relatively low, I should discuss his shortcomings in depth. I hate to play the “low upside” game, as it is dangerous, so I’ll let other detractors make that point, but it is a viable concern. His turnover rate was quite high and his offensive creation was exposed to the point of embarrassment during the tournament. I also question his ability to shake NBA defenders and find open shots. Nonetheless, he is a smart scorer that has shown the ability to slash, pass and finish well above his peers at the college level. Most accounts regard Harden as a team player that is coachable and works hard on defense. Harden will play successfully in the league for a long time, but its hard to envision him as a star on a team going deep into the playoffs (a hard pill to swallow if he is drafted top 3)

10) James Johnson
Johnson is a very intriguing prospect with sleeper potential. He can play like a 7-footer and finish efficiently around the basket, but can also outrun most forwards in transition and has body and foot movement as well as the instincts to score in space. Johnson has the ability to score from and defend against three different positions. It’s tough to rank him because his career will likely be based upon the system he is drafted into. A coach that can recognize his abilities, mismatches and teach him some of the game he doesn’t understand yet (especially on defense) will make a great difference.

11) Jordan Hill
Hill never dominated like some expected he would at the collegiate level, leading to remarks that he does not have a true passion for the game. I don’t see him as someone that you would want to feed consistently in the post because his passing, decision-making, and all-around post moves are not above average. There are some positives to his game but do you really want to draft a guy without those skills in the top 8? The rebounding, shotblocking and overall explosiveness are there, combine that with his early stage in the developmental process, you have an intriguing upside. But Hill has a lot to learn about defensive positioning, and decision making.

12) Sam Young
Young looks like he could be as old as your grandfather, and his age is a concern among the “upside” inclined scouts. Yet, Young clearly has the physical tools to be an imposing perimeter defender. On offense, he likes to put defenders on his back and work facing away from the basket. His spot up shot is also impressive. He will out-rebound his defender most games. With Young, you know what your going to get. The production and work ethic was there at Pitt and there is relatively limited downside.

13) Tyler Hansbrough
There is something about the heart in Hansbrough that leads me to believe there is no way this kid stops working on his game until he becomes a factor in his NBA team’s gameplan. Many highly touted college stars take their fame for granted, but Psycho T will assuredly continue to work at his craft and squeeze out every bit of potential there is to his game. He has something you just can’t teach: commitment, maybe better than any other athlete I’ve ever witnessed. With that said, he has physical limitations. The main worry is that he is not quick or explosive enough to guard NBA power forwards. He may not be, but you can take it to the bank that he will try day and night to train his body to do so. Hansbrough trademarked the flailing-away, turnaround, mini-hook in college that was virtually un-guardable. There is no precedent for that shot working at the NBA level. He may be best suited adding some dribble moves to his offensive arsenal to create mismatches against bigger Power Forwards that will likely be out-jumping him on the other end.

14) Wayne Ellington
Ellington showed talent in the Final Four that he had all along; he’s a marksman shooter who rarely makes poor decisions. His limitations come in the area of 1-on-1 creation. But contrary to modern belief, and Iverson supporters, basketball is not a game of 1-on-1. Ellington is a proven winner that has played in an offense that forced talented players to buy into a team effort and sacrifice their own statistical advances. Ellington’s draft stock may have been hurt because he was not able to score huge totals, but take a look at this shooting percentages and points per possession and a clearer picture is observed. Ellington surpasses all SGs in this draft with a 48% shooting percentage and is third with 1.04 points per possession. Very impressive figures given the team he played on and the competition he faced.

15) Chase Budinger
Budinger lacks an assertive nature to his game that could have really propelled him into top 5 draft status. All the skills are there, the passing, leaping ability, shooting, height, intelligence, team-focus- but the assertiveness he lacks, the listlessness with which he plays is not teachable, you either have it or you don’t. Budinger should be able to score and make plays at an NBA level but I would not want the ball in his hands, or have him on the court for that matter, in the waning seconds of a game. Very fundamentally sound, not very tough.

16) Derrick Brown
Xavier is still one of the more underrated development programs for underdrafted NBA players. Every year the lefty’s shot improved. He has the physical tools to be an excellent wing defender, great footwork, wingspan, lateral quickness and defensive grit. He has a fine all-around game that is above average is almost every sense other than the shot creation from the dribble. His spot up game must be respected and he can’t be left open. It amazes me how low he is projected to be drafted. He will surely find his way on an NBA roster and be a productive member of a team due to his ability to shoot at such a high percentage

17) Omri Crisspi
A 6’8’’ scorer/slasher from Israel. Tape shows that he moves well in transition, moves well without the ball and finishes strong. Word from the pre-draft workouts is that he’s a very physical presence- manhandling Austin Daye until he had to get stitches from a cut lip. He seems to be a high energy guy who flies around the court and his numbers show strong efficiency. His jumpshot is not that fluid and will have to develop moves within the arc to become a true offensive weapon.

18) Austin Daye
Scouts salivate over a guy with a 7’2’’ wingspan that can play on the parameter. He can also dribble, finish and shoot from long range at an above average rate. Nonetheless, there is a lot that concerns me as far as his stature. Workouts have proved what many believe, it is very easy to bully around someone who is 6’10’’ 190 lbs. I can not see him guarding anyone in the post, at least not with this body. He seems soft on defense, slow to trail when off the ball and afraid of banging with bigger bodies. His legs are twigs and he has bad knees, not a good sign. He gets very little lift from his frail legs; he does not move well in the defensive half court, neither does he grab rebounds way above his opponents.

19) Earl Clark
There is much to be disappointed with when you watch Clark’s game. He has the upside of at top 5 pick, with tons of length for his skill set, dribble creation ability for his size, shotblocking, rebounding and defensive potential. But in Clark’s case, the potential has not been tapped, and we’re not really sure he has what it takes to untap all of it. He plays hard about 50% of the time, his turnover rate is too high, he frequently takes a worse shot than he could easily attain, he gets pushed around and doesn’t fight back- all signs of a draft day bust. Nonetheless, Clark has all of the athletic attributes to someday down the road put the skills together to make himself productive.

20) DeMarre Carroll
Carroll is an unquestioned steal in this draft. Carroll brings unmatched toughness and intensity every second he’s on the court. Don’t worry about the height (6’8’’), the wingspan is there (6’10’’). Carroll will not jump out the gym but he can run the floor very well and finish with great efficiency. I’m impressed by his maturation; Carroll has improved a different facet of his game every year at Missouri. He has learned to play on the wing, dribble and pull up in traffic and has refined his shooting form (still needs work). Scouts may worry about his inability to explode to the cup at the next level, but Carroll has found more than enough ways to mitigate his deficiencies, as can be determined from his 58% 2pt fg%. Expect Carroll to continue to be aggressive on the glass and continue to improve defensively. You’ve got to be impressed by his per-minute and rate statistics.

21) Taj Gibson
Another efficient scorer that will likely be underdrafted because he is 1 inch short of 6’10’’. Gibson is a great shotblocker, rebounder and scores at a very high rate – Gibson shot 60% last year. You will rarely, if ever, see Gibson standing around and being unproductive on the defensive end. Gibson has very active feet and hands. DeRozan gets the love from the scouts but Gibson did more in USC’s wins last year than did DeRozan. Gibson is scrappy and aggressive when fighting for position in the post. When he catches it in position, he usually scores (see his shooting %). Gibson’s most underrated aspect is his faceup game which he can improve upon at the next level to make a deadly arsenal of power, length and finesse moves.

22) Marcus Thornton
I was impressed with Thornton’s competitive nature, scoring ability and leadership in the tournament this year. When we look back at how good that North Carolina team was you may forget that Thornton almost single-handedly shot them out of the tournament. Thornton has an innate ability to connect on shots with defenders’ arms in his face. He does fall in love with his shot a little too much during certain games, and should probably utilize his equally impressive slashing game more often. Thornton moves well without the ball, at least when he knows its coming to him, as he cuts well and shoots quickly and effectively in set plays. His dribble drive moves are not refined. He has produced impressive rebound rates for someone his size (6’4’’) but he must continue to improve so as to avoid becoming simply a shooting specialtist.

23) Gerald Henderson
Henderson was impressive in his final year at Duke but there is many more question marks surrounding his pro game from my end. He is a 6’5’’ shooting guard that can not shoot from range. Many praise his midrange game but his shooting percentage from midrange is awful. The ball was not always in his hands in crunch time at Duke. He does not handle the basketball well enough to be a pro guard at this point. I don’t quite get what a pro coach is going to do with a smaller guard that cannot shoot or dribble. G is a smart player, that is committed to defense and passing efficiently. He also is athletic enough to play bigger than he is on defense. I see Henderson as an average prospect that does not deserve the current accolades.

24) Eric Maynor
Maynor was the go-to man at VCU; it will be his ability to transform from a shoot-first PG to a facilitator that will determine his ultimate success. Many rank him higher than this, as they take the aforementioned premise as a given. Nonetheless, you have to question his shot selection and his alarmingly high turnover rate. If you look closely you may reconsider his true ability to become a starting NBA point guard that makes the players on the court better every possession. There is an uncontrolled nature to his game, as well as what some scouts determine as an “unwillingness to play defense.” Yet, in his four year career Maynor has displayed skills that argue he belongs in the league. He can score from beyond the arc and in the mid-range. He pushes the ball well in transition and makes plays with the dribble among the best at his level. Much more so than Evans, Flynn and Holliday, he has become a successful leader and commander on the court.

25) Jonas Jerebko
Gametape and scouting reports show Jerebko to be a legitimate first round prospect. His Eurocamp tape shows a fundamentally sound, high energy, very efficient player. Equally notable is an intensity streak on defense that isn’t that common at this camp. At 6’9’’ 210 he has a lean frame, but his impressive offensive rebounding numbers last season show someone who isn’t afraid to mix it up inside. With Jerebko, the question arises, is he versatile and able to play 2 positions well or is he in between two positions, unable to guard either. I’m partial to the former.

26) B.J. Mullens
B.J. is just not ready to step foot on an NBA floor at all at this point. He made an absolutely horrible decision coming out at this point, deciding not to continue to refine his raw ability at Ohio State. He has no jumpshot to speak of, turns the ball over frequently and cannot pass from the post, losses the ball almost every time he puts it on the floor, has been labeled as lazy and uncommitted, is beat way too often for someone his size and is frequently caught out of position on defense. Drafting Mullens is simply a gamble. If an established franchise has the ability to gamble, then so be it, but I would not recommend Mullens to a developing franchise. As of now all Mullens is, is a big body that can run the floor, when he wants.

27) Jeff Pendergraph
Pendergraph was quietly effective throughout last season and likely deserved some of the hype that Harden received for Arizona State’s success this past season. JP rarely takes a poor shot (TS% = 70%) He shot 78% from the freethrow line and lead every player in this draft with 1.37 points per possession. Maybe Pendergraphs most underrated skill is his knack for finding the ball off the offensive glass. Pendergraph makes players around him better by setting strong picks and uses them to get in position for his own easy baskets. He is faulted because he is not a “jump out of the gym” athlete but when you watch him play you see someone with unmatched intensity, great floor movement and intelligent play. I’d take that over someone who can jump out of the gym.

28) Darren Collison
By most accounts, Collison had a disappointing senior season. I rate Collison low more because I see him as a backup than as a floor general for a playoff-winning team. He has the smarts, the quickness and grit to play defense at the next level and he will likely reach his potential due to a strong work ethic and mentality. He shot an outstanding 39% from beyond the arc but do not expect that to translate to the next level. The deep range has been question, he did not take that many 3s, and his size and release will make his pull-up three very guardable. His body needs more bulk to handle the beating that a starting NBA PG takes. Ultimately, his role on a great team will be as a backup, and his draft stock should value him as such.

29) Tyreke Evans
Evans is wildly overrated by the media and mainstream scouting services. There is no doubt Evans can put the ball in the bucket, but there are so many facets of his game that do not portend to winning basketball. He is a turnover machine, rarely puts teammates in a strong position to score, does not seem to be focused off the court, is not a true point guard/floor general, takes very poor shots that will leave NBA teammates unnerved, pounds the ball endlessly and does not make quick/efficient passes to force the defense to rotate and has horrible decision making/basketball IQ instincts. Evans may end up playing the 2 in the NBA. He has the wingspan to guard the 2, and doesn’t have the smarts to be an effective 1. With that said, he is probably the best 1 on 1 scorer in this draft. If we were drafting a rise-and-shine, 1-on-1 league then he would be my first pick. But we’re not.

30) Nick Calathes
I’ll address the common refrain that Calathes is too “soft” and not “strong” enough to play in the league. When taking the ball to the basket he shows the potential to overcome these detractions. He scores at a high rate and is able to create contact. Where his lack of strength is an issue is in his ball handling. His turnover rate was too high to be a fulltime PG. Nonetheless, he has a solid spot up jumpshot.

31) Jeff Teague
Teague, as a PG, does not impress me. As a PG, he does not have commanding control of the ball in the half court, which leads to a high rate of turnover. His game is more based on creating for himself, and not for others. The word is that he is slightly uncoachable, and has trouble buying into a system that is not built around him scoring the rock. Can he guard the 2 at the next level? That’s a huge question mark. He didn’t seem to put that much emphasis in locking down at the collegiate level. Teague takes poor shots and makes too many poor decisions for a true point guard. He could end up as a solid backup- using his instincts and slashing ability to supplant starters with an offensive boost. He has a burst that is uncommon among his peers and it shows when scoring in transition and beating defenders with poor footwork.

32) Toney Douglas
Douglas was very impressive in March on both ends of the floor. Florida State’s impressive ACC tournament run was predicated on Douglas’ lock down defense and red-hot shooting touch. He’s a better handler than a passer and I question whether he can run a successful team from the point. Pairing him with a tall floor general would make sense. TD can pull up, shoot off screens and cannot be left alone- but he does not create from the dribble as well as you may expect. A very underrated defender.

33) Jrue Holiday
Holiday certainly should have stayed one more year in college. Nevertheless, scouts are enamored by his offensive arsenal and potential. At only 19 years of age there is room for improvement, but you really wonder whether sitting on an NBA bench for a few years is his best career decision. I rank him this low with this in mind: I see him taking so long to develop that the team that drafts him will not likely be the team that owns him when he finally develops. Holiday seemed loss in the offensive system at UCLA and very not productive at all in his minutes. Drafting Holiday should be considered highly speculative.

34) Demar DeRozan
I do not see what most scouts see when I watch DeRozan. His offensive game is predictable, he is slow to pull up when handling, his long range numbers are poor, he committed way too many turnovers, will take a long time until is ready to contribute, does not seem to understand the game that well, is frequently out of position and confused on defense and needed plays to be run for him to score. I suppose that a coach that is willing to spend long hours teaching DeRozan how to get the most from his athletic, impressive frame, he could reach the potential that many see from him. But that is not a given. He shoots well from inside the arc but does not take many threes and stays away from contact. The risk/reward is certainly not there in the top 10 with DeRozan.

35) Jonny Flynn
Flynn spends a little too much time pounding the ball and has not shown the ability to effectively utilize his teammates in the flow of the offense. Every shot looks good to Flynn and he did not shoot at a great clip compared to his peers. He has the ability to get to the rim but takes way too many threes considering how poorly he shot them. I’m not sure why Boeheim didn’t tell him to stop shooting so many threes or whether Flynn didn’t listen but this still leaves me perplexed. His turnover rate is very high, he seems uninterested in defense and rarely challenges his defender when shooting and has one of the smallest wingspans in the draft (limited defensive upside even if he tried). Flynn has a scorer’s mentality and showed quickness beyond anyone that guarded him this past year. It’s tough to see him fitting in a solid role for a winning NBA team. Teams that make playoff runs don’t have starting PGs as out of control as Flynn. An undersized bench scorer is the only upside I see with Flynn.

36) Jack McClinton
McClinton will find a role in the next level and will be a good find if he slips late second round. He has a smooth stroke, NBA 3 pt range, can catch off of the screen and shoot before the defender can get a hand up. He also has an intricate midrange game. The issue is he has a very tiny 6’2’’ wingspan and may not be able to contest at the next level. He will be defensively limited and likely a solid role player.

37) Patrick Mills
An injury and a poor conference hurt Mills’ stock this year. He’s more of a scorer than a true point guard and will likely not fit the role of a traditional NBA PG. His range is excellent and pulls up in the midrange with consistency. Mills can create and do damage in fast-paced action and in transition. His half court defense is questionable, with no track record of shutting down quality opponents. His turnover rate is high and shooting percentage isn’t great and is barely 6 feet.

38) DaJuan Summers
Summers simply did not live up to his billing at Georgetown. Reports were that he never had the mental makeup to take his game to the potential it had- not a good sign for someone who will likely be given a non-guaranteed second round contract. His turnover rate was high, he seemed soft in the paint, and his rebounding rate is awfully low for someone with his raw ability. His wingspan (7’1’’) is impressive but, like most of his positive attributes, they are mainly physical and not based on actual productivity. Summers does an absolutely horrible job with shot selection. He takes too many outside shots when given the opportunity for higher percentage shots. He takes an inordinate amount of closely contested shots, and finishes those at a disappointing clip. He doesn’t have any semblance of a handle so his offensive game is quite limited. Summers should be considered a raw prospect with boom or bust written all over.

39) Ahmad Nivins
Nivins was extremely productive over the course of four years at St. Josephs. His field goal and true shooting percentage values are very impressive given he played pretty much every minute for the Hawks this year. Nivins has face up and back to the basket ability. He should be counted on to rebound and block shots at a capable level in the NBA. He has the length and athletic ability to improve, even if he is one of the older members of this draft class.

40) Paul harris
Harris rounds out the top 40 due to his very impressive NBA workouts the past few weeks. Reports say that he is aggressive, chiseled, long and physical, and has also improved his shooting dramatically since the end of the NCAA season. Harris has never been an elite prospect but you can easily see him factoring into an NBA playoff game- finding a role as a pest defender, with the toughness to bother perimeter scorers. If Harris can improve his offensive game (especially ball handling) to the point where no areas can be significantly exploited, expect Harris to be a sleeper in this draft.


Knicksboy34
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I disagree. I think Griffin

I disagree. I think Griffin is long and away the #1 draft prospect this year in the draft.

Meditated States
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NO

Sorry Rubio is not the top player in this draft. I have my doubts if he is top 4. He is young and unproven. He could be top 4, but I need more proof than some highlights and 4 points 3 ast in the olympics for an average. I am not saying he is not good. Blake is the number one talent in this draft. A dominant 4 or 5 makes your team better right away. I don't see Rubio like D Will and CP3. He is even less proven than the both of them. I am not even impressed by Rubio's highlights honestly. I could be wrong but I don't see the big fuss.

Knicksboy34
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No Offense put your 1st

No Offense put your 1st sentence in Rubio's case is wrong. John Wall?

ckessler33
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nope

u lost me at Blair #3, i hear your thoughts on Rubio/Griffen and understand, I will give you some credit for going through and writing your opinions out very well for us to read and understand, but I just simply disagree with you way too much, there are some I agree with you on(McClinton, Clark, Pendagraph, even the Griffen/Rubio part) but for the most I most say your dead wrong, but that's just my opinion, we'll see who was right in a few years.

Meditated States
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If Budinger is not tough

Why was he the only player on his team who played well against that NBA factory UL team in the NCAA tournament. I don't question his toughness after that, because everyone played scared except him. He also played for 3 different coaches in his three years and still increased his scoring and shooting soooo I don't know. I disagree.

ckessler33
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sorry

uhm, u origanlly thought ariz played unc, man up and admitt your mistake instead of changing what you wrote, also uofl isnt an nba factory, maybe this year they give 2 good players, but thats it

Meditated States
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Oh yeah thats right

Still he was the only player that played well that day. That was against T will and Clark two good defenders. That makes my point even better good look.

ckessler33
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w/e

true bout chase,give ya that

llperez
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first off

I just wanted to say I appreciate the well thought thread. But as is always the case, I have some serious disagreements. No way is Blair 3rd. The dude is 6-6 and being a physical freak does'nt always translate in the NBA because everyone is stronger and bigger then the guys in college.

Also, as a west coast guy who saw a lot of PAC 10 basketball, I can't see why you would put DeRozan so low on this list. Go back and watch how he played at the end of the season in leading USC to the PAC title and in the NCAA tournament. He was a beast. His abbility to hit the boards and finish in transition should keep him on the court while his perimeter skills catch up. I honestly believe he has a chance to be one of the top 3 or 4 players from this draft when it is all said and done.

gatorheels
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You have Evans 29th & Flynn

You have Evans 29th & Flynn 35th.....Dude R U on drugs?

gatorheels
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By the way that list looks

By the way that list looks I'm shocked you didn't have John Bryant ranked in the top 10.

Meditated States
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I said you were right ckessler33

What the F^ck more do you want? That admitted it right there. It still helps my case because that team had even better defenders and he went 9 for 15 against them and their full court press.

Remarq
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Evans, Flynn, LOL. This is a

Evans, Flynn, LOL. This is a joke I assume?

Hale
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Demare Carroll in the top 20

Demare Carroll in the top 20 seems out of place as well.

Michael.S.
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this is

ludacris

birdman113
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the only thing i agree with

the only thing i agree with is Paul Harris being in the top 40, a good defender and rebounder.

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