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Insider Help! Bullish on Rose, Why John Wall is the next Jason Kidd

wizman
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Insider Help! Bullish on Rose, Why John Wall is the next Jason Kidd

Can someone please post the Insider article

Bullish on Rose from 10/26 &

Why John Wall is the next Jason Kidd 10/10 article?

Much appreciated!


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ProudGrandpa
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The next Jason Kidd?

Why are they limiting John Wall like that? at least as far as scoring is concerned...

M-DYMES
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Size...yea Court

Size...yea

Court Vision...Edge to Kidd by a fair amount. He never has been one to force the issue, he always sees the right move.

Scoring...by far Wall will be the better scorer

Passing ability...Kidd will be the better of the 2, even if Wall is a dominant passer. Kidd is arguably the greatest passer of all time.

Atleticism...Kidd is an impressive athlete, but Wall is a phenom athletically

Rebounding...Kidd is again arguably the greatest rebounding PG of all time. Sorry Wall.

Defense....Kidd is again one of the greatest defending PGs of all time, Wall has that same amount of potential defensively IMO.

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Here's the article: What do

Here's the article:

What do the Chicago Bulls, Oklahoma City Thunder and Washington Wizards have in common? They all boast athletic, scoring point guards. Indeed, Derrick Rose, Russell Westbrook and John Wall are three of the most compelling athletes ever at the point guard position. All three were born within 23 months of each other, making this a golden age of athletic point guards.

With an MVP award on his résumé, Rose is the most accomplished of the three, but Westbrook and Wall's athletic ability leaves the door open for them to one day match Rose's honor. Much of their success and productivity hinges on their physical ability. But which one is the best athlete? On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the best, here's how I rated them.
Leaping ability

The ability to glide through the air for the spectacular play is the skill most people readily identify with athleticism. Rose is a power leaper who explodes off the floor with velocity. He might have the highest vertical leap, but he's also the most one-dimensional leaper of the three, preferring to finish at the rim after taking off from two legs. While it makes for great highlights, it can somewhat hinder his ability around the basket -- particularly when driving down the lane -- because it allows a helping big man an extra half second to recover. Evidence: Rose led the NBA in shots blocked last season.

Westbrook is as close to a perfect leaper as there is. He owns a high vertical leap, the ability to take off from far out and his versatility in jumping effectively off of one foot or two make him the complete package. Westbrook was third in the league among guards in dunks (52) and had almost as many as Rose and Wall combined (58).
Russell Westbrook
Glenn James/NBAE/Getty ImagesRussell Westbrook could use some more muscle to ward off physical defenders.

The Thunder point guard also has the unique ability to create a late burst with his last two steps -- after he picks up his dribble -- allowing him to essentially accelerate in the air, rendering most help defense useless. Westbrook's long arms also allow him to time follow-up dunks while taking off from outside the charge circle.

Wall is at his best exploding off his vertical to catch alley-oops, which he can finish with authority. But his hang time and elevation don't quite match up to Westbrook's.

Rose 9.5, Westbrook 10, Wall 9.5

Speed

When it comes to speed, we're talking end-to-end speed, arguably a point guard's most useful physical tool. From one foul line to the other, there is no faster player in the game than Wall. His speed is such that he can create a fast break out of almost any turnover, loose ball or rebound. While most players begin to decelerate and look for an open wing or trailer once crossing half court, Wall continues to accelerate until the defense can no longer keep up.

Often this will take Wall below the foul line, putting him in a position to shoot. It can also take him too far under the rim, which can sometimes lead to low-percentage shot attempts. But for the most part it works; Wall was second in the league with 5.6 fast-break points per game last year.

Rose is not quite as speedy as Wall but in many ways uses his speed more effectively. The edge Rose has over Wall is that he operates with more control. There's a fine line between going full tilt and turning over the ball. In fact, if Wall slowed down, he would certainly trim his average of 3.8 turnovers per game.

Westbrook likes to push but not with the determination and zeal of Rose or Wall. Often he brings the ball upcourt at a measured trot with his body upright, then goes into attack mode when he sees an opening. The difference: Rose and Wall's quickness creates openings while Westbrook just exploits them.

Rose 9.5, Westbrook 9, Wall 10

Quickness

Top-flight point guards have to consistently beat their man off the dribble whether they are of the pass-first variety or have a scorer's mentality. The kind of quickness that matters most is 3-point line-to-basket quickness.

Rose has the game's best first step regardless of position. Rose sets up much of his penetration with left-to-right crossovers or simple head fakes to get the defender to lean before exploding in the opposite direction. Much like a running back who plants his foot and explodes upfield, Rose can quickly turn the corner and exploit most holes in defenses. But his true skill is being able to change directions several times from the 3-point line to the rim without sacrificing speed, which leaves help defenders flat-footed. Rose is also good at coming down from speed, which can be as tricky for defenders to handle as his initial burst.

Westbrook's deceptive quickness is better suited for the half-court game as he likes to use low dribbles to split double-teams and has a second step just as quick as his first, allowing him to get up to speed in tight spaces. In many ways -- thanks to long arms and excellent floor vision -- Westbrook is just as dangerous as Rose. But Rose's quickness is a cut above.

Wall has a nice variety of setup moves to initiate his ample quickness but simply doesn't put defenders on notice the way his counterparts do. For all Wall's quickness he averages only 1.9 points at the rim in the half-court set. Too often Wall settles for an outside shot, which decreases the number of times he can use his quickness. Either way Wall takes a backseat to Rose and Westbrook in this category.

Rose 10, Westbrook 9.5, Wall 9

Strength

Thanks to a powerful build and tree trunk-like legs, Rose makes this the most one-sided category. Rose's strength puts nearly everyone he faces at a disadvantage. When he turns the corner with his dribble, defenders are forced to be as physical as possible to prevent him from getting to the hole, which often results in overzealous hacking that sends him to the line. Rose ranks 11th in free throw attempts with 6.85 attempts per game.

In the air he invites contact, which ironically almost seems to stabilize him as he double-clutches his way to yet another reverse layup.

Westbrook is no slouch in this category but doesn't exactly turn heads. He won't bully you like Deron Williams but has shown resiliency in taking contact at the rim. Rarely do hard fouls discourage him. Putting on five to 10 more pounds of muscle would make Westbrook near impervious to midair assaults from opposing guards.
Derick Rose, John Wall
Geoff Burke/US PresswireJohn Wall is young, but in time he could rise to Rose's level.

Wall's strength is one of the more underrated aspects of his game. At 6-foot-4 and blessed with excellent size -- broad shoulders and long arms -- Wall's strength will be an even bigger asset when he develops a post game and begins to take smaller guards on the block. But Wall's speed and quickness is so effective that he rarely resorts to strength as a means of gaining an advantage.

Rose 10, Westbrook 9, Wall 8.5
Balance

Balance is one of the most overlooked athletic attributes yet easily one of the most important. It's the building block all athletic fundamentals are built upon. Excellent balance allows players to operate at speed, quickly change direction and absorb contact while still getting off a shot. Rose's excellent balance and agility allow him to tie together each of his abilities seamlessly, which results in near athletic perfection when operating on the floor. That balance is the source of his ability to stop and start so suddenly and shift to a higher gear on his penetration.

Westbrook also shines in this category, particularly in the air, as he effectively gets off shots when bumped while high above ground. Good thing, since Westbrook often takes off from one foot, making him easier to knock off balance. His gaudy 10.2 points in the paint per game ranks 14th overall ahead of both Rose and Wall.

This category is where Wall falls way short. A lack of balance is Wall's biggest weakness. Ironically, his brilliant speed might contribute to his wobbly ways, as he can sometimes move too fast for his own good and find himself out of control. Also his center of gravity at speed is so low that the faster he goes he tends to lean forward, causing him to lose his balance, especially if he's bumped.

Rose 9.5, Westbrook 9, Wall 7

Final score: Rose 48.5, Westbrook 46.5, Wall 44

Even among the elite athletes in the game Derrick Rose stands out as the best. From a physical standpoint the fourth-year point guard has almost no weakness. He's the fastest, strongest and most fluid NBA player of his generation at his position.

While not quite on Rose's level, Westbrook is electrifying in his own right and has one of the most complete athletic arsenals at any position. Westbrook lacks Rose's body control and strength -- which is why he finishes second -- but turns his speed and leaping ability into tangible stats in a way Rose doesn't.

Westbrook edges Rose in dunks, fast-break points, free throw attempts and points in the paint -- four key categories that point to great athleticism for small guards.

Wall still possesses game-breaking ability and is the youngest of the three. With a better understanding of how to use his immense tools he could wind up on the level of Rose and Westbrook. But for now Rose stands alone as the most athletic guard in the NBA.

Didn't see the article comparing Wall and Kidd though.

M-DYMES
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I was just going off of GP's

I was just going off of GP's post. I unfortunately don't have insider. I'm an outsider.

wizman
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Awesome and link!

Thanks for the article!

Here is the link for the other article, if you get a chance.

http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/story?id=7084295&_slug_=nba-why-john-wall...

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