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Changing the game

Tongue-Out-Like-23
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Changing the game

Who are your top 5 players of all time that really revolutionized and influenced the game of basketball to what it is today?

5. Allen Iverson: Say whatever you want but this guy changed the game, I had never seen anybody want to be more like this guy since I had seen Michael. His crossovers and hip hop style of basketball changed the game.

4. Julius Erving/Vince Carter: They brought a new flair to the game of basketball with their high flying moves to the rim. They set a tone for super athletic basketball players, not just athletes.. but athletic basketball players.

3. Magic/Bird: The word "Rivalry" is synonymous with the two. Both are winners and had the heart of a lion. Who said country boys can't play basketball? One of the best clutch shooters of all time. Who said 6'9" guys had to be in the post? His flashy passes and brilliant smile changed the game of basketball forever.

2. Bill Russell: This guy OOZED defense. 25rpg isn't easy, but this guy would do it. He is the best defensive player of all time. He made people want to play great post defense for one reason.. Defense = Championships.. and he made that statement true.. 11 rings for the best defensive player of all time.

1. Michael Jordan. Enough said.


HandDownManDown13
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you might should make number

you might should make number 2 Wilt/Russell.

The Wilt vs. Russell rivalry was one of the greatest as well, and Wilt really did revolutionize the game. He really was a great before his time.

Also i think Arvydas Sabonis and Dikembe Mutombo deserve acolades for what they did in revolutionizing the European game and fostering basketball in Africa respectively.

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Kevin Garnett is definitely

Kevin Garnett is definitely one for igniting the prep to pros debate.

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George Mikan. He was the

George Mikan. He was the first big man in the game and that's what really changed the game to what it is today.

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Dirk Nowitzki I think is the

Dirk Nowitzki I think is the reason we have so much big guys who want to be jump shooters.

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^ but isn't that a bad thing?

^ but isn't that a bad thing? I think those guys should get in the post and play where there supposed to. I actually think guys like Dirk have hurt the game, but that's just my opinion.

And for Wilt to not be on that list as laughable, the NBA changed so many rules just because of Wilt.

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@delfam Totally agree with

@delfam

Totally agree with you, seeing a guy 7 feet tall pulling up for a 3 is mind-numbing, and I'm a Raptor fan so I have to watch it all the time. IMO, Dirk ruined the game.

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Changing the Game

I know that Allen Iverson was an NBA icon, SLAM made him almost the Tupac of the NBA and multiple posters have expressed his importance, but to me, there were many more who "changed the game" much more than AI. Iverson is a player who has yet to be duplicated, he really has no comparison for better or for worse. Yes, there have been smaller guards who score big, but there will be none like him, which while it makes him a rare and even great player, it hardly means he "changed the game". He changed hairstyles, he maybe even changed attitudes with his rebel without a cause nature, but he hardly introduced the NBA to hip hop culture.

As for changing the game, I think a lot of your picks were right. Michael Jordan is really enough said, his influence and abilities changed basketball. Julis Erving was MJ before MJ as far as being an icon and influencing wing play with his incredible athletic grace, though I would leave Vince Carter out of the equation. The people that mentioned George Mikan and Wilt Chamberlain are right on the money, the NBA became a different league trying to make rules to compete with these players who were all but unstoppable. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was another, though I think he changed NCAA play more so than the NBA, which had already faced the aforementioned two players. Shaquille O'Neal is another who comes to mind, I do not even think the Celtics (or any teams playing the Celtics back than, since Bill Russell was also an incredibly poor FT shooter), had thought of using a system focusing on removing an offensive force from the game by constantly fouling them. Hack-a-Shaq to me is a system that may not be incredibly effective, but it has become a system used constantly to try and limit the effect of monstrous bigs who are poor free throw shooters. Watch out Dwight Howard/Blake Griffin.

It all depends on what you focus on as far as changing the game, but Wilt Chamberlain changed NBA basketball more so than any NBA player before him. He changed the way the ball was inbounded, changed the way free throws were shot and the NBA widened the lanes considerably due to Wilt. When you used to be allowed a running start to shoot free throws, Wilt used this to dunk foul shots. With his length and athleticism, it would be safe to say this would have made him a prolific foul shooter. I doubt there were many worries about him touching the line either, the guy was so far ahead of his time. Bill Russell in many ways is iconic in his ability to have won championships against a player of Wilt's dominance, truly showing that no matter how great the individual was, that basketball is a sport where the best team wins. Titles are usually best remembered for the performance of the best individuals on a team, and Michael Jordan and Bill Russell were the two best at getting a team to rise to a certain level of greatness that they both portrayed.

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